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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Periodic Table formulations from the year 2016:

2016   Video of Periodic Table Battleship
2016   Valentine Periodic Table
2016   Where Your Elements Came From Periodic Table
2016   Collective Work of Chemists
2016   Genetic Codon Periodic Table
2016   Philatelic Table of The Elements
2016   NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table
2016   Advanced Spiral Periodic Classification of the Elements
2016   Triadic Networks
2016   Clock Face Periodic Table
2016   Sensu Periodic Table
2016   KAS Periodic Table
2016   Harrington's Periodic Tables
2016   Lindsay's Periodic Table
2016   Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster
2016   Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney
2016   Football, Periodic Table of (Book)
2016   Cricket, Heavy Rock, Wine, Cocktails, Football, Hip Hop: Periodic Table "of" Books
2016   Complete Periodic Table Chemistry Clock: H to Og
2016   Instructables 3D Periodic Table
2016   Education Technology, Periodic Table of
2016   Songs, Periodic Table of
2016   Chemistry Eye Chart
2016   Pictures & Words
2016   Alchemical Table of Symbols
2016   90 Global Issues, Periodic Table of
2016   Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of
2016   Story Telling, Periodic Table of
2016   Mystery of Matter: Three Videos
2016   Russian Orthodox Elementary System of Unity of the Periodicity of the Electroatoms of the Universe


2016

Video of Periodic Table Battleship

A video of Periodic Table Battleship being played:

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2016

Valentine Periodic Table

A Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh:

Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh

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2016

Where Your Elements Came From Periodic Table

The featured periodic table, from Astronomy Picture of The Day (APOD) is color coded to indicate humanity's best guess as to the nuclear origin of all known elements. The sites of nuclear creation of some elements, such as copper, are not really well known and are continuing topics of observational and computational research.

Where Your Elements Came From

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2016

Collective Work of Chemists

From an article on LinkedIn:

Twelve elements were known from the Ancient Times, and were described by Romans and Greeks. The remaining 106 elements have been discovered by scientists of 15 different countries during the last 4 centuries. In addition, 19 elements of those 106 (18%) have been co-discovered by researchers of two countries.

Although some of them (like Bromine or Thallium) were isolated separately at the same time by chemists of different nationalities within the race to discover new elements in 18th-21st centuries, most of them have been obtained since then through collaborative research, like the recently discovered Ununpentium, Ununseptium and Ununoctium.

Another example is the isolation of Radium and Polonium by the Polish Maria Skłodowska-Curie and her French husband, Pierre Curie.

Thus, Periodic Table is the result of a collective and long-term work of hundreds of scientists.

It is noteworthy to see that Russia and United States have discovered mainly artificial elements.

Collective Work of Chemists

Collective Work of Chemists

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2016

Genetic Codon Periodic Table

Heinrich Ferreira, splicejunction.blogspot.com, has created a 'periodic table' for the 20 amino acids, organized by generic code and hydrophobic value.

"I realized that when one orders the codons in the genetic code by Hamming distance of base changes between the 64 different codons for the 20 amino acids, that the amino acids with similar hydrophobic/polar nature automatically cluster together.

"This shows how the genetic code is optimized to minimize the production of incorrectly folded proteins.

"Thus, in the case of a single base change which results in a different amino acid being used, the chances are that incorrect amino acid will have the same or similar hydrophobic qualities are actually quite high due to the codons appearing next to each other on the Genetic Code periodic table.

"This representation, like the periodic table, is a torus where the adjacent codons wrap around from bottom to top and left to right."

Genetic Code Periodic Table

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2016

Philatelic Table of The Elements

Larry French writes:

"I created and first displayed [this Philatelic Table of the Elements] at the ACS National Meeting in San Diego.

"The table has been assembled with each element is represented by a single (or in a few cases a pair) of postage stamps. The table offers a platform for discussions of people, places, sources and applications associated with 114 elements. A total of 73 stamp issuing entities are represented. The table runs from hydrogen, with a North Vietnamese stamp celebrating the test of first Chinese H bomb, to livermorium, represented by a Soviet issue marking the 25th anniversary of the Nuclear Research Institute at Dubna. The table travels from Bolivia's Salar de Uyuni (lithium) to the Enewetak Atoll of the Marshall Islands (einsteinium) and spotlights environmental impacts of phosphate extraction in Nauru and lead mining in Peru. Discoverers and inventors from Moissan and Soddy to Auer and the Curies are met along the way. A range of applications including cesium formate brines in North Sea oil and gas drilling, indium in solar energy conversion, lanthanum in electric cars and technetium in positron emission tomographic medical imaging is included.

"Eventually, my aim is to produce a book which includes an essay for each element and stamp. I have made significant headway with the writing but there is much still to be done."

Larry French
Baker Professor of Chemistry
St. Lawrence University

Click here for full size version

Philatelic periodic table

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2016

NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table

NAWA, Nagayasu: A Japanese schoolteacher and periodic table designer presents a Janet form periodic table in the traditional Japanese "byobu" style:

NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table

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2016

Advanced Spiral Periodic Classification of the Elements

By Imran Ali, Mohd. Suhail and Al Arsh Basheer an Advanced spiral periodic classification of the elements. Read the paper here.

Advanced Spiral Periodic Table

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2016

Triadic Networks

From orijikan.com: a great summary paper by Dr. Eric Scerri on the role of triads in evolution of the periodic table and a paper by Dr. Alfio Zambon inspired this work. Here is my contribution: the Triadic Networks (TN), which is a general mathematical design, and the Triadic Elemental Networks (TEN), that apply that design to chemical elements. For a full discussion, read the pdf here.

triad networks

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2016

Clock Face Periodic Table

In 2014 Prof. Martyn Poliakoff – of YouTube fame – showed us a working Periodic Table clock, here.

The designer of the clock, Nagayasu (a Japannese school teacher), has now provided a fuller periodic table based on the same design:

clock

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2016

Sensu or Fan Periodic Table

By NAWA, Nagayasu — A Japanese schoolteacher and periodic table designer — a "Sensu" or fan periodic table:

Sensu or fan

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2016

KAS Periodic Table

The KAS periodic table reproduces and depicts the nuclear properties of chemical elements. This periodic table depicts not only the trends of nuclear properties, but also reproduces their numerical values that remain very close to the experimental values (difference less than 4%).

The Segre Chart is based on the number of protons, Z, and the number of neutrons, N. It is like a library of nuclei and shows the recorded data only. The Segre Chart can not work when the number of neutrons is not given. But KAS Periodic Table works when the number of neutrons is not given.It does not require the number of neutrons to produce the results.This is a simple chart based on the number of protons of chemical element. We identify the following properties of elements:-

Read more here, here and here.

KAS Periodic Table

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2016

Harrington Periodic Tables

So we start this effort tabula rasa (without preconceived ideas).

1) All atoms have a default "common denominator" structure at 270 mass units, irrespective of the element under discussion. Therefore, no elements seen as wisps and glints past this point are of consequence. Ergo, the bizarre stability of Dubnium 270.

2) This common structure is divided up by the exact same divisors as are the electron orbitals - i.e. the prime numbers of 2, 3, 5, and 7.

3) Pi as a divisor produces its own, unique and dominating organizational patterns.

4) Each of these sets of plotted nuclide "boxes" use identical formats, but are arranged in vertical columns based on the set of 270 AMUs being divided by these prime numbers. So the 5D Table is 270/5 or 54 AMUs per vertical column/"tower".

5) Each system reinforces unique elemental parameters. The system based on 3/Pi, and its second "harmonic" at 6/2Pi reflects physical properties. The 2Pi configuration almost exactly emulates the "conventional" / Mendeleevian element-based table, except the periods are based upon mass not element count, and these periods do not organize in rows of 18 elements, but rather rows of 44 mass units. The organization/configuration of this default structure is: Pi(Pi^2 + Pi + 1) = 44 This is the primary physical default structure of the periodic table and spectrum of elements, as projected in 3D space, and as perceptible to humans.

6) 5D determines everything with magnetic properties. This disproves every single theory that attributes electron shell behavior as determining magnetic parameters. Clearly here we see that the nucleus is "calling the shots", with electron orbitals conforming as driven. The various red and blue shaded boxes are found at extremes of top and bottom.

7) The system of 7D determines most of all physical parameters of surface and molecular behavior. Here we see surface tension, density, softness and hardness, malleability, boiling and melting points and a few other behaviors. This system of correlation is fully unknown to conventional theory. Notice how superlative parameters bunch at the top and bottom of this configuration.

8) When this system of 270 mass units is divided by 12, for 22 mass units per period, the periodic cycle rate precisely correlates with known Type 1 and 2 elemental superconductors. The physical correlations between periodic repetition at 22 mass units, the 270 count system, and superconductors is also completely novel and not compatible to conventional BCS theory. The correlation between this 22 count system and the three largest cross section nuclides known to man (113Cd, 157Gd and 135Xe) is also completely heretical, however mathematically symmetrical and perfect it may actually be organized.

9) The center portion of this common 270 count structure is named the "Cordillera", for the habit of multiple parallel mountain ridges sharing a common alignment. This area is profoundly affected by Pi-based organizations. The very center at 135Xe indicates that the overall table should terminate at element 108 Hassium at 270 mass units. This has a Proton/Neutron ratio of 3:2. This actual nuclide has very poor stability, unlike Dubnium 105 with 270 mass counts. This nuclide has a ratio of precisely 1:Pi/2, indicating the entire table describes a spectrum of mass organizational states spanning the integer ratio of 1:1 (Deuterium) to 3:2, then on through to 1:Pi/2. Current accepted atomic theories concerning "Islands of Stability" are ridiculous.

WAH

Click on the image to see the full size version

KAS Periodic Table

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2016

Lindsay's Periodic Table

From Geoffrey Lindsay:

"I put together a table of elements that may be useful for teaching 101 chem from the point of view of valence electrons and the energy sublevels of the valence orbitals".

Click image to see a larger version.

Lindsay's Periodic Table

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2016

Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster

Tom Field, President, Field Tested Systems, LLC and Contributing Editor, Sky & Telescope Magazine says: "We have complete redesigned our Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster and put it up for sale."

A couple of links:

www.fieldtestedsystems.com - classroom gas-tube spectroscopy
www.rspec-astro.com - astronomical spectroscopy
Sky & Telescope

Emission Spectra

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2016

Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney

Tom Lehrer's Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney with all 118 elements [as known to Harvard, as they have been discovered], including the newest ones: nihonium, moscovium, tennessine and oganesson.

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2016

Football, Periodic Table of (Book)

A book called: The Periodic Table of Football by Nick Holt, available on Amazon. Click here for a larger version of the periodic table.

 

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2016

Cricket, Heavy Rock, Wine, Cocktails, Football, Hip Hop: Periodic Table "of" Books

The periodic table is a widely used metaphor for arranging about 100 items:

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2016

Complete Periodic Table Chemistry Clock: H to Og

From MrEorganization: "I've created a new periodic table clock for my son, a chemistry undergrad at Whitman College, a holiday present and a celebration of the official new names."

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2016

Instructables 3D Periodic Table

From Makendo on the Instructables website:

The first periodic table was developed in 1862 by a French geologist called Alexandre-Émile Béguyer de Chancourtois. He plotted the elements on a cylinder with a circumference of 16 units, and noted the resulting helix placed elements with similar properties in line with each other. But his idea - which he called the "Telluric Spiral" (see here), because the element tellurium was near the middle - never caught on, perhaps because it was published in a geology journal unread by chemists, and because de Chancourtois failed to include the diagram and described the helix as a square circle triangle.

Mendeleev got all the glory, and it is his 1869 version (dramatically updated, but still recognizable) that nearly everyone uses today.

This instructable [project] documents my efforts to reimagine a 3D periodic table of the elements, using modern making methods. It's based on the structure of a chiral nanotube, and is made from a 3D printed lattice, laser cut acrylic, a lazy susan bearing, 118 sample vials and a cylindrical lamp.

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2016

Education Technology, Periodic Table of

From Daily Genius, a Periodic Table of Education Technology:

Periodic Table of Education Technology

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2016

Songs, Periodic Table of

By Theo J. Mertzimekis, a periodic table of songs/pieces related to the elements that can be played using Spotify. Click here or on the PT image below to go to the 'active' page:

songs - pieces

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2016

Chemistry Eye Chart

From Cascadia Press, an Eye Chart for Chemists:

Eye Chart

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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2016

Pictures & Words

A couple of periodic tables from Keith Enevoldsen with information shown in Pictures & Words:

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

 

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2016

Alchemical Table of Symbols

The Alchemical Table of Symbols was designed by Aristotle Pramagioulis of egregoredesign. The periodic table is available as a poster and many other forms:

Thanks to Fathi Habashi for the tip!

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2016

90 Global Issues, Periodic Table of

Indian Schoolgirl Perfectly Reproduces Periodic Table by Inserting 90 Global Issues, a headline from The Epoc Times.

"Below is the periodic table, with the elemental symbols as they should be. But rather than a chemical, each symbol abbreviates a relevant social problem affecting the world today. Meet Kaanchi Chopra, the creator of this unique period table of elements. Chopra is a 17-year-old student and artist from Delhi, India. Because she uses her art as a platform to incite change, Chopra refers to herself as an ardent artivist.

From Kaanchi Chopra's ART AND ACTIVISM blog:

"As I flipped through the pages of [my chemistry textbook] trying to decipher the meaning of the title, a flashback to Grade 10 suddenly reminded me of the Periodic Table. How we used to make numerous mnemonics to memorize the Alkali metals, Alkaline Earth metals, Halogens, Noble gases and Transitional metals.

"In this entire rote learning process, I found something different and probably something as meaningful as those elements. I realized that each and every symbol of the elements in the Periodic Table was an acronym of a global issue. It could be expanded to form a word which represented one of humanity's worst vices. A few words in this table also represent the various movements and social issues which have gained a lot of attention in the recent times. That was when I decided to make a periodic table of 90 global issues and here it is!"

Thanks to Carel Kusters for the tip!

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2016

Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of rejected element names by Andy Brunning's Compound Interest:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2016

Story Telling, Periodic Table of

A Periodic Table of Storytelling by James Harris Design:

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2016

Mystery of Matter: Three Videos

From Alpha-Omega, three videos about the discovery of the Periodic Table.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is an exciting series about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long and continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Three episodes tell the story of seven of history's most important scientists as they seek to identify, understand and organize the basic building blocks of matter.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements shows us not only what these scientific explorers discovered but also how, using actors to reveal the creative process through the scientists' own words and conveying their landmark discoveries through re-enactments shot with replicas of their original lab equipment.

Knitting these strands together is host Michael Emerson, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor.

Meet Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, whose discovery of oxygen led to the modern science of chemistry, and Humphry Davy, who made electricity a powerful new tool in the search for elements.

Watch Dmitri Mendeleev invent the Periodic Table, and see Marie Curie's groundbreaking research on radioactivity crack open a window into the atom.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements brings the history of science to life for today's television audience.:

 

 

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2016

Russian Orthodox Elementary System of Unity of the Periodicity of the Electroatoms of the Universe

By Bence Szalai: Russian Orthodox Elementary System of Unity of the Periodicity of the Electroatoms of the Universe

See the 2D version here and the 3d vesion here (in Ukrainian)

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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