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Internet Database of Periodic Tables


There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

Use the buttons below to select from the 1000+ Periodic Tables in the database:

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

Or, select:     Search by Year:      Text search:



The 10 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

1909     Garrett's The Periodic Law
1907     Grouping of The Elements to Illustrate Refractivity
2020     FReNeTic
2018     Data Rich Periodic Table
2012     Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour
2019     International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri
2004     Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez
2019     Colburn's 2019 Periodic Table of The Elements
2020     What Is A Chemical Element?
2020     Annotated Periodic Table


1909

Garrett's The Periodic Law

A book reviewing The Periodic Law by A.E. Garrett, pub. D. Appelton & Co (1909). This work shows the state of knowledge in the first decade of the 20th century.

René Vernon writes:

"On page 43 Garrett notes that, '[Thomas] Carnelley was the first English chemist to work out in detail the manner in which the properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic weights. His papers on this subject appeared in the Philosophical Magazine between the years 1879 and 1885.' "

Read more one Carnelley here.

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1907

Grouping of The Elements to Illustrate Refractivity

From C. Cuthbertson & E. Parr Metcalfe, Part III On The Refractive Indices of Gaseous Potassium, Zinc, Mercury, Arsenic Selenium and Tellurium, Phil. Trans. A: Mathematical & Physical Sciences, vol 207, pp135–148, 1907.

René Vernon writes:

"A curious periodic table which runs from group 12 on the left to group 13 on the right (see below). It seems to have done that way to bring out the pattern in multiples of refractivities i.e. x½ x 4 x 6 x10. The border around the elements in groups 15 to K-Rb-Cs in group 1 denotes this relatively strong regularity among the refractivity values. The L for iodine is a printer's error."

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2020

FReNeTic

FReNeTiC is the multi-Award winning 'Frenzied word game of the Elements' where players race against the clock to form as many words as possible using the Element Symbols of The Periodic Table.

In this fast and furious word game players score points equivalent to the atomic numbers of each tile used to create the word, for example Ba Na Na = Banana = 78 points.

The first player to score 1000 points wins!

Everyone plays all the time, quick set up and easy-to-follow rules with FRaNTiC FUN AcTiON! (And no, you don't need to know the Periodic Table or be a GeNiUS to play).

Thanks to Marcus for the tip!

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2018

Data Rich Periodic Table

Explore James L. Marshall's data rich periodic table.

Dr. Marsall provided the location data for Carmen Giunta's interactive, searchable Google map of places associated with the developers of the periodic table and the chemical elements.

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2012

Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour

Dr. Eric Scerri from the Chemistry Department at UCLA giving a distinguished invited lecture at the Oscar Peterson auditorium of Concordia University, in Montreal. The topic is the history and iconic nature of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri

Interview with leading expert on the periodic table and UCLA professor, Eric Scerri, to celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2004

Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez

A digitised 2004 book by book by Julio Gutiérrez-Samanez.

Julio writes:

"These matrix tables are inspired by the method used by the Peruvian chemist Oswaldo Baca Mendoza (1908-1962).

"The tables are read in this way: The Law of Formation of nuclei generates all the horizontal series Z, is dependent on n (series of integers numbers) and a constant K = 1. In the step-to-right tables (n) it will be equal to or greater than 0. In Janet's Left-Step table, (n) will be less than or equal to (-1). The values of this series Z will serve as a constant for the second law.

"The Group Formation Law or vertical series. Its generate the numeric values of the columns either from left to right or from right to left. In system A -1: With the first law: n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg = 1, 3 11, 19, 37, 55, 87 ... That is: 1H, 3Li, 11Na, 19K, 37Rb, 55Cs, 87Fr, 119, 169 ... Changing the values of n or Z, all the columns of the table will be obtained.

"In system A -2: With the first law: on the left, n = -1, then Z = 0. The vertical series Zg will be: 2He, 10Ne, 18Ar, 36Kr, 54Xe, 86Rn, 118Og, 168, 218. .. Similarly, changing the n or Z values, we can fills the columns of the table. In system B -1: With the first law: for n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg will be; 1H, 3Li, 5B, 13Al, 21Sc, 39Y, 57La, 89Ac, 121, 171 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. In system B -2: (Its mathematizes the Janet system). With the first law: on the left, for n = -1, then Z = 0.

"The vertical series Zg will be; 2He, 4Be, 12Mg, 20Ca, 38Sr, 56Ba, 88Ra, 120, 170, 220 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. The third law of the limiting the periods or periodic law, appears graphically, by comparison between rows: For example: in table B -1, in column Z = 3, after 1H and 2He, en of the first horizontal line, the value 3 appears, which is already entered in the first column as 3Li, therefore, that part of the first horizontal row (from 3 to 50) is deleted.

"The same happens with the number 5 in column 3, which is already in the first column as 5B, therefore it will be deleted in the second row from 5 to 52. The same applies to pair 13, 21 of the column Z = 9, same, with the pair 39, 57 of the column Z = 19 and of the pair 89, 121 of the column Z = 33. For that reason the periods: P are duplicated function: 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2) .... = 2, 2, 8, 8, 18, 18, 32, 32 ... and the forms are exact and staggered. The colors represent the quantum functions: s (red), p (orange), d (yellow), f (green), g (blue)."

Read the book here (in Spanish).

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2019

Colburn's 2019 Periodic Table of The Elements

Justin Lee Colburn writes:

"What is unique to my Periodic Table is the fact that any Elements Electron Spin can be identified for Orbital Diagrams using a technique I have called 'Element Shifting'.

"Elements with an Up spin Valence Electron are shifted up and Elements with a down spin are shifted down. Also, the Hund's rule Exceptions are Highlighted in the Transition Metals so their orbital diagrams can also be identified easily.

"In addition, an accurate numbering system can be applied to all the elements with Helium placed in Group 2 instead of Group 18. I believe that quantitative data should take priority when giving elements their position, but this system is meant to be dynamic rather than static. In my Periodic Table System, (1-8) corresponds to Valence Electrons in the s and p orbitals and then the 9-18 and 19-32 corresponds to core electron in d and f orbitals .

I believe that it is important to begin by showing students the first 20 Elements FIRST because they all add Outer Valence Electrons which makes the Periodic Table logic easy to follow. Also explaining that Hydrogen and Helium are anomalies with more than one logical position, can really help clear up confusion for new students.

"After element 20, the Transition Elements such as scandium 21 begin adding core electrons in the d orbital the current standard (1-18) numbering system does not reflect this. One of the reasons why I prefer keeping the s and p block elements on the outside of the table and the f and d block elements on the inside is because of how they add electrons to their orbitals.

"I have been developing a curriculum based on this system that I believe will help students learn and understand the logic and trends of The Periodic Table more efficiently than the standard. Rather than memorizing Element information, Students will truly be able to follow the logic based on the location of the Elements, simple counting and using the numbering system."

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2020

What Is A Chemical Element?

A Collection of Essays by Chemists, Philosophers, Historians, and Educators Edited by Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi published by Oxford University Press

  • A collection of 14 edited papers from historians of chemistry, philosophers of chemistry, and chemists with epistemological and educational concerns
  • Contains educational debates concerning how to teach and present the concept of elements
  • Provides a beneficial, scholarly, unique, and understandable overview of the current debate on the chemical elemen.

The concept of a chemical element is foundational within the field of chemistry, but there is wide disagreement over its definition. Even the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) claims two distinct definitions: a species of atoms versus one which identifies chemical elements with the simple substances bearing their names. The double definition of elements proposed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry contrasts an abstract meaning and an operational one. Nevertheless, the philosophical aspects of this notion are not fully captured by the IUPAC definitions, despite the fact that they were crucial for the construction of the Periodic Table. Although rich scientific literature on the element and the periodic table exists as well as a recent growth in the philosophy of chemistry, scholars are still searching for a definitive answer to this important question: What is an element?

Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi have teamed up to assemble a group of scholars to provide readers an overview of the current state of the debate on chemical elements from epistemological, historical, and educational perspectives. What Is A Chemical Element? fills a gap for the benefit of the whole chemistry community-experimental researchers, philosophers, chemistry educators, and anyone looking to learn more about the elements of the periodic table.

Foreword
Introduction
CHAPTER 1: The many questions raised by the dual concept of 'element' Eric R. Scerri
CHAPTER 2: From simple substance to chemical element Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
CHAPTER 3: Dmitrii Mendeleev's concept of the chemical element prior to the Periodic Law Nathan M. Brooks
CHAPTER 4: Referring to chemical elements and compounds: Colourless airs in late eighteenth century chemical practice Geoffrey Blumenthal, James Ladyman, and Vanessa Seifert
CHAPTER 5: The Changing Relation Between Atomicity and Elementarity: From Lavoisier to Dalton Marina P. Banchetti-Robino
CHAPTER 6: Origins of the Ambiguity of the Current Definition of Chemical Element Joseph E. Earley
CHAPTER 7: The Existence of Elements, and the Elements of Existence Robin F. Hendry
CHAPTER 8: Kant, Cassirer, and the Idea of Chemical Element Farzad Mahootian
CHAPTER 9: The Operational Definition of the Elements: A Philosophical Reappraisal Joachim Schummer
CHAPTER 10: Substance and Function: The case of Chemical Elements Jean-Pierre Llored
CHAPTER 11: Making elements Klaus Ruthenberg
CHAPTER 12: A formal approach to the conceptual development of chemical element Guillermo Restrepo
CHAPTER 13: Chemical Elements and Chemical Substances: Rethinking Paneth's Distinction Sara N. Hjimans
CHAPTER 14: The dual conception of the chemical element: epistemic aspects and implications for chemical education Elena Ghibaudi, Alberto Regis, and Ezio Roletto
Appendix: Reference list on the philosophy of chemistry Index.

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2020

Annotated Periodic Table

From René Vernon's paper, Vernon, R.E. Organising the metals and nonmetals. Found Chem (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10698-020-09356-6 (in the supplementary material).

Click image to enlarge.

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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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