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pre 1900 formulations
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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

2019 has been designated the International Year of the Periodic Table as it is the 150th Anniversary of the formulation of Mendeleev's Tabelle I

 pre 1900 formulations  1900 to 1949 formulations  1950 to 1999 formulations  2000 to 2009 formulations    Spiral formulations  3 dimensional formulations
 Data mapping periodic tables  Miscellaneous periodic tables  Books and reviews  non-chemistry periodic tables      All periodic tables


The 10 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

2019     Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements
2019     St Catharine's College: Celebrating the Periodic Table
1904     Ramsay's Periodic Arrangement of The Elements (Redrawn)
2016     Story Telling, Periodic Table of
2019     Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book
1913     van den Broek Periodic Table 3
1911     van den Broek Periodic Table 2
1888     Stoney's Spiral
2019     Grainger's Elemental Periodicity with "Concentric Spheres Intersecting Orthogonal Planes" Formulation
1908     Ramsay's Periodic Table


2019

Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements

From the RSC Website:

"A glistering, shining spiral made of silver, gold, platinum, palladium and a diamond forms the show-stopping apex of the tribute from the University of Cambridge's St Catharine's college to the International Year of the Periodic Table.

"Commissioned to match George Schaltenbrand's 1920 design for a helical gathering of the elements – albeit extended to all 118 current elements – and signed by Yuri Oganessian, it is almost certainly the most expensive periodic table in the world."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

St Catharine's College: Celebrating the Periodic Table

The United Nations have proclaimed 2019 to be the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements since it is the 150th anniversary of the publication of Dmitri Mendeleev's first Periodic Table. But was it really the first?

St Catharine's College, Cambridge, in the UK, is proud to exhibit its fine collection of material relating to the early development of the Periodic Table. Starting from the first list of elements which emerged around the time of the French Revolution in the late 1780s, and the first list of atomic masses drawn up by Manchester chemist John Dalton, we explore why six different chemists from around the world each came up with their own versions of the iconic table in the 1860s.

From the RSC Website:

"Curated by periodic table superfan Peter Wothers, the main body of the exhibition is a staggering collection of historic books that trace the creation of chemistry's roadmap.

"This is an unprecedented record of the periodic table's origins, from early alchemical texts through to original copies of Antoine Lavoisier's 1789 Elementary Treatise of Chemistry – the first true list of elements – and notes on the discoveries of (among others) John Newlands, Julius Lothar Meyer through to Dmitri Mendeleev".

Celebrating the periodic table – the first edition of Mendeleev's textbook from Chemistry World on Vimeo.

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1904

Ramsay's Periodic Arrangement of The Elements (Redrawn)

Redrawn (by Mark Leach in 2019) from Scientific American in 1904, an article by Sir William Ramsay discussing the Periodic Arrangement of The Elements:

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2016

Story Telling, Periodic Table of

A Periodic Table of Storytelling by James Harris Design:

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2019

Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book

Nicolay Kultovoy, website, as sent me a copy of his Periodic Table book, entitled [Google Translate]: Book 5. Part 11-08. A single quantum mechanical model of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the periodic table of chemical elements of D.I. Mendeleev.

In a mixture of Russian & English, the PDF of the book can be viewed here.

Chapter 1. Triune (electrons, nucleons, chemical elements) quantum mechanical model of Colt. Three
1.1 the Rules of filling of the orbits of electrons.
1.2 Pyramidal lattice.
1.3 models with cubic sieve.
1.4 models with face-centered lattice.
1.5 quantum Mechanical form of the periodic table of chemical elements.
1.6 Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table.
 
Chapter 2. A lattice model of the nucleus. Model 62
2.1 Berezovsky G. N.
2.2 I. Boldov
2.4 Konovalov.
2.5 Manturov V.
2.6 Semikov S. A.
2.7 alpha-partial model of the atomic nucleus.
2.8 Burtaev V.
 
Chapter 3. Various lattice (crystal) model of the nucleus of an atom. One hundred five
3.0 Luis Pauling.
3.1 Valery Tsimmerman. ADOMAH Periodic Table. Model 3-2.
3.2 Klishev B. V. Model 3-1.
3.3 Garai J. Model 3-1.
3.4 Winger E Model 4-2.
3.5 Norman D. Cook. Model 4-1.
3.6 Gamal A. Nasser. Model 4-1.
3.7 D. Asanbaeva Model 4-1.
3.8 Datsuk V. K.
3.9 Bolotov B.
3.10 Djibladze M. I.
3.11 Dyukin S. V.
3.12 A. N. Mishin.
3.13 M. M. Protodyakonov
3.14 Dry I. N.
3.15 Ulf-G. Meißner.
3.16 Foreign works.
 
Chapter 4. Long-period periodic table. One hundred eighty one
4.1 long-Period representation of the periodic table.
4.2 Artamonov, G. N.
4.3 Galiulin R. V.
4.4 E. K. Spirin
4.5. Khoroshavin L.
4.6 Step form proposed by Thomsen and Bohr.
4.7 Symmetrical shape of the periodic table.
 
Chapter 5. Construction of a periodic table based on the structure of orbitals. Two hundred twenty one
5.1 construction of the periodic table on the basis of orbitals.
5.2 Short V. M.
5.3 Kulakov, the Novosibirsk table of multiplets.
 
Chapter 6. Atomic structure. Two hundred forty eight
6.1 Table of isotopes.
6.2 the structure of the orbitals.

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1913

van den Broek Periodic Table 3

From Wikipedia: Antonius Johannes van den Broek (1870-1926) was a Dutch amateur physicist notable for being the first who realized that the number of an element in the periodic table (now called atomic number) corresponds to the charge of its atomic nucleus. The 1911 inspired the experimental work of Henry Moseley, who found good experimental evidence for it by 1913. van den Broek envisaged the basic building block to be the 'alphon', which weighed twice as much as a hydrogen atom.

Read more in Chapter 4, Antonius Van Den Broek, Moseley and the Concept of Atomic Number by Eric Scerri. This chapter can be found in the book: For Science, King & Country: The Life and Legacy of Henry Moseley (Edited by Roy MacLeod, Russell G Egdell and Elizabeth Bruton).

van den Broek's periodic table of 1907: Annalen der Physik, 4 (23), (1907), 199-203

van den Broek's periodic table of 1911: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 12 (1911), 490-497); and also a paper in Nature the same year entitled: The Number of Possible Elements and Mendeléff's "Cubic" Periodic System, Nature volume 87, page 78 (20 July 1911)

van den Broek's periodic table of 1913: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 14, (1913), 32-41

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1911

van den Broek Periodic Table 2

From Wikipedia: Antonius Johannes van den Broek (1870-1926) was a Dutch amateur physicist notable for being the first who realized that the number of an element in the periodic table (now called atomic number) corresponds to the charge of its atomic nucleus. The 1911 inspired the experimental work of Henry Moseley, who found good experimental evidence for it by 1913. van den Broek envisaged the basic building block to be the 'alphon', which weighed twice as much as a hydrogen atom.

Read more in Chapter 4, Antonius Van Den Broek, Moseley and the Concept of Atomic Number by Eric Scerri. This chapter can be found in the book: For Science, King & Country: The Life and Legacy of Henry Moseley (Edited by Roy MacLeod, Russell G Egdell and Elizabeth Bruton).

van den Broek's periodic table of 1907: Annalen der Physik, 4 (23), (1907), 199-203

van den Broek's periodic table of 1911: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 12 (1911), 490-497); and also a paper in Nature the same year entitled: The Number of Possible Elements and Mendeléff's "Cubic" Periodic System, Nature volume 87, page 78 (20 July 1911)

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1888

Stoney's Spiral

Johnstone Stoney's Spiral, taken from A. E. Garrett's The Periodic Law (page 167, 1909 pub. D. Appleton And Company). The reference is given – page 167 – is: Phil. Mag. [6], 4, pp 411 et seq.; Proc. Roy. Soc., 1888, p115.

very short introduction

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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2019

Grainger's Elemental Periodicity with "Concentric Spheres Intersecting Orthogonal Planes" Formulation

From Tony Grainger, an Elemental Periodicity formulation with concentric spheres intersecting orthogonal planes.

Tony writes:

"I hand sketched this periodic table about a decade ago and placed it on my cubicle window at UTAS, with minimal comments from work mates. It bears some similarity to other formulations in the database, especially when cut along the left axis and laid flat. The concept of all elements of a period being aligned along orthogonal planes cutting a sphere was inherent in the original sketch. When I began using SVG about five years ago I realised I could draw this as a real projection of the 3D model. It was on the back burner, until I found the original sketch during a tidy up."

There are two images of this 3D formulation: an "inside_corner_below/outside_corner_above" (top image) and an "outside_corner_below/inside_corner_above" lower image.

  • The "inside corner below" is like looking at the junction of a floor and two walls in the corner of a room.
  • The "outside corner above" is like looking up at the underside of an overhanging corner of a building.
  • The "outside corner below" is like looking down on the corner of a large box.
  • The "inside corner above" is like looking at the junction of walls and a ceiling in a room.

 

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1908

Ramsay's Periodic Table

William Ramsay with a section of his 1904 periodic table as a portrait in Vanity Fair.

From the Science History Institute:

In 1892 Ramsay's curiosity was piqued by Lord Rayleigh's observation that the density of nitrogen extracted from the air was always greater than nitrogen released from various chemical compounds. Ramsay then set about looking for an unknown gas in air of greater density, which – when he found it – he named argon.

While investigating for the presence of argon in a uranium-bearing mineral, he instead discovered helium, which since 1868 had been known to exist, but only in the sun. This second discovery led him to suggest the existence of a new group of elements in the periodic table. He and his coworkers quickly isolated neon, krypton, and xenon from the earth's atmosphere. 

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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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