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pre 1900 formulations
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2019 has been designated the International Year of the Periodic Table as it is the 150th Anniversary of the formulation of Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Internet Database of Periodic Tables


There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

Use the buttons below to select from the 1000+ Periodic Tables in the database:

 pre 1900 formulations  1900 to 1949 formulations  1950 to 1999 formulations  2000 to 2009 formulations    Spiral formulations  3 dimensional formulations
 Data mapping periodic tables  Miscellaneous periodic tables  Books and reviews  non-chemistry periodic tables      All periodic tables

Or, select:     Search by Year:      Text search:



The 10 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

1955     Element Hunters
2019     Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table
2019     Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition
2019     Cylindrical Periodic Table of Elements
2003     Two-Amphitheater Pyramid Periodic Table
1942     Kipp (& Mazurs') Periodic Table in Style of Spiral and Plane Lemniscate
1950     Sidgwick's Periodic Classification (Mendeleeff)
1957     Laubengayer's Long Periodic Table
2006     Demers' Système du Québécium
2019     Weise's Tetrahedral Periodic Table


1955

Element Hunters

A YouTube video, The Element Hunters.

"Scientist in Berkeley discover new elements [Californium & Einsteinium] from hydrogen bomb debris in 1951 and then use the 60 inch Cyclotron to create Mendelevium, element 101.

"Team includes Nobel Prizes winner Glenn Seaborg and famed element hunter, Albert Ghiorso.

"A supercharged VW bug is used to carry the radioactive material to the chemistry lab. Original footage of the scientists shot by KQED in 16 mm film."

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip! 

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2019

Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table

Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table.

"To celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements, our editors have curated research papers, commentaries and multimedia from Nature and the Nature Research journals. Dive in to find out what connects sodium with Sri Lanka, how many times astatine was discovered and where the White House got its name... And much more!"

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition

The 2nd Edition of Eric Scerri's well redarded book, The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance has been published by Oxford University Press and is available at all good bookshops, including online.

See Eric's website EricScerri.com and Twitter Feed.



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2019

Cylindrical Periodic Table of Elements

A YouTube video by Takehiko Ishiguro: Cylindrical Periodic Table of Elements.

Three types of the cylindrical periodic table of elements are demonstrated with a rotating table. Comments on them are given at the end of the video (in English). The Japanese version is here.

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2003

Two-Amphitheater Pyramid Periodic Table

From Chemical Education Journal (CEJ), Vol. 7, No. 2

A Novel Way of Visualization of the Periodic Table of the Elements by Alaa El-Deen Ali Mohamed, Alexandria University, Egypt.

The author writes:

"New form of the periodic table of the elements is given in this paper. This form can be seen as two amphitheater pyramids facing each other. The cubes that meet are s-elements (interior) then the p-elements then d-elements and the f-elements at last (exterior). The table can be represented by X-, Y- and Z-axes, where the Z-axis gives the number of the period that the element occupies. The table can be modeled by colored cubes helping in introducing the periodic table to the pupils early in the primary education."

Thanks to René for the tip!

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1942

Kipp (& Mazurs') Periodic Table in Style of Spiral and Plane Lemniscate

Kipp, Friedrich, and Edward G. Mazurs. "Periodic Table in Style of Spiral and Plane Lemniscate". Glass, circa 1942–1957. Edward G. Mazurs Collection of Periodic Systems Images, Box 1. Science History Institute, Philadelphia. https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/nz806022g

Periodic table in style of spiral and plane lemniscate 1942 (Original design) circa 1957 (Date attributed to slide).

This table was originated by Friedrich Kipp in 1942 and classified by chemist Edward G. Mazurs as Type IIB2-2 in his seminal work Types of Graphic Representation of the Periodic System of Chemical Elements (1957).A version of this table appears as Figure 49 on page 122 of Mazurs' 1957 publication.

Thanks to Dhr. J.G. van Gils for the tip!

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1950

Sidgwick's Periodic Classification (Mendeleeff)

From N.V. Sidgwick, Chemical Elements and Their Compounds, vol. 1, Oxford University, London, p. xxviii (1950).

René Vernon writes:

"In this curious table the Lanthanides are located in group IIIA while the Actinides have been fragmented.

Instead:

• Ac, Th, and Pa are located in groups IIIA, IVA and VA under Lu, Hf, and Ta, respectively
• The uranides, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, are located in group VIA, under W."

Sidgwick writes:

"This subgroup (VIA) consists of Cr, Mo, W, and U, to which the 'uranide' elements, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm (which might be assigned to any Group from III to VI) must now be added." (p. 998)

"...the trans-uranium elements 93–6... for the first time give clear evidence of the opening of the 'second rare earth series', the 'uranides', through the expansion of the fifth quantum group from 18 towards 32." (p. 1069)

"The question whether the fifth quantum group of electrons which is completed up to 18 in gold begins to expand towards 32, as the fourth does in cerium, has now been settled by the chemical properties of these newly discovered elements. In the Ln the beginning of the expansion is marked by the main valency becoming and remaining 3. With these later elements of the seventh period there is scarcely any sign of valencies other than those of the group until we come to uranium... Up to and including uranium, the group valency is always the stablest, but beyond this no further rise of valency occurs, such as we find in rhenium and osmium. Hence the point of departure of the new series of structures (corresponding to lanthanum in the first series) is obviously uranium, and the series should be called the uranides. (p. 1092):

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1957

Laubengayer's Long Periodic Table

From A.W. Laubengayer, General Chemistry, revised ed., Holt, Reinhart and Winston, New York (1957).

René Vernon writes:

"In this busy table the author appears to show three of each of groups I to VII (e.g group I; group IA; group IB) and one group VIII, and one group 0, for a total of 23 groups and subgroups."

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2006

Demers' Système du Québécium

Updated from this 2002 entry comes: Quebec System, Numbers and geometry in the classification of the elements by Pierre Demers.

Demers writes:

"First, I present the Periodic Table of Elements, and I proceed to improve it. By an arithmetic and geometrical analysis, I make appear important symmetries of order four which exist in the arrangement of the atoms between them. I confirm these results with an original discussion of irregular atoms. I will try, in a work that will follow, to interpret the symmetries of the classification by the symmetries of the atom which are associated with the precession cones of the kinetic moments and orbitals."

Read [much] more on this page of links:



 

 

Thanks to Conal for the tip!

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2019

Weise's Tetrahedral Periodic Table

A Facebook video by Dmitry Weise showing how the conventional periodic table can be morphed into a tetrahedral formulation via the Janet Left Step:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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