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pre 1900 formulations
1900 to 1949 formulations
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2019 has been designated the International Year of the Periodic Table as it is the 150th Anniversary of the formulation of Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Internet Database of Periodic Tables


There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

Use the buttons below to select from the 1000+ Periodic Tables in the database:

 pre 1900 formulations  1900 to 1949 formulations  1950 to 1999 formulations  2000 to 2009 formulations    Spiral formulations  3 dimensional formulations
 Data mapping periodic tables  Miscellaneous periodic tables  Books and reviews  non-chemistry periodic tables      All periodic tables

Or, select:     Search by Year:      Text search:



The 10 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

2011     Tresvyatskii's Periodic Table
2019     Knitted Blanket Periodic Table, In Time to Celebrate 150th Anniversary
2019     Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots
1925     Model of the Periodic System of de Chancourtois
1814     Wollaston Slide Rule of Chemical Equivalents
1963     Royal Military College of Science Three-dimensional Spiral
1909     Chemical News' Periodic Arrangement of the Elements
2019     Setting The Table
2019     Béguyer de Chancourtois' Vis Tellurique: A Better View
2019     Heritage Periodic Table Display


2011

Tresvyatskii's Periodic Table

Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics, Vol. 49, Nos. 9-10, 2011:

The paper published below represents Tresvyatskii's fundamental study. It establishes the interrelation between the ionization potential and place of an element in the periodic table. Oxides with a certain composition may form only when an element is ionized to the needed degree. Hence, the ionization potential of elements is an important parameter that governs the formation of an oxide. In this regard, the dependence of the ionization potential on the place of an element in the periodic table is of paramount importance. The role of the ionization potential in the hightemperature chemistry of oxide compounds, which underlies modern oxide materials science, is especially significant. The paper is published in Tresvyatskii's original version.

René adds:

A depiction of the short-form table, showing some clever thinking:

  • The reversal in atomic number order of Np to Am
  • The return of the curides
  • The placement of the Ln and the curides alongside the main table
  • The assignment of the Ln and An to groups
  • Triple periodicity among the Ln and heavy An

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2019

Knitted Blanket Periodic Table, In Time to Celebrate 150th Anniversary

Trish Bosco thought we might be interested in her periodic table blanket.

"It took me almost 4 years to make it, but I finished in time to celebrate the 150th anniversary! You can see my progression here":

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2019

Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots

Jane Stewart decided to Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots:





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1925

Model of the Periodic System of de Chancourtois

From the Science Museum in the UK collection, a model of the Periodic System of de Chancourtois from 1862:

"Model demonstrating the telluric screw periodic system of Alexander-Emile Beguyer de Chancourtois proposed in a paper published in 1862.

"This model, made by the Science Museum in 1925, provides a rare physical realisation of arguably the earliest periodic system of for the elements. It was devised by the French geologist, Alexander-Emile Beguyer de Chancourtois in 1862, 7 years prior to Dmitri Mendeleev's periodic table.

"De Chancourtois arranged the elements in the order of their atomic weights along a helix which was traced on the surface of a vertical cylinder, with an angle of 45 degrees to its axis. The base of the cylinder was divided into 16 equal parts (the atomic weight of oxygen), and the lengths of the spiral corresponding to the weights of the elements were found by taking the one-sixteenth part of a complete turn as a unit":

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1814

Wollaston Slide Rule of Chemical Equivalents

From the Science Museum in the UK collection, the Wollaston slide rule of chemical equivalents:

"Three sliding scales of chemical equivalents, all with same manuscripts marks, published by W Cary, devised by W H Wollast.

"William Hyde Wollaston was a leading chemist and natural philosopher during the early 19th century. In 1813 he invented a chemical slide rule to illustrate his paper published the following year entitled: A synoptic scale of chemical equivalents. He was interested in the ratio of weights of various substances used up in reactions.

"Positioning the slider with the weight of the substance set against it will show you the weights of other substances which will react with it. This fundamental ordering based on measurement paved the way for the periodic table of the elements":

Mark Leach writes:

"I have editied the image above, so as to set the scale to zero, below:"

On inspection, it will be observed that many of the atomic weights are rather different to our modern understanding. My readings for some of the atomic weights are:

10 H 12.5 H 1.25 (1.008)
10 C 75 C 7.5 (12.011)
    O 10 (15.999)
    P 17.5 (30.974)
azote = N   N 17.5 (14.007)
    S 20 (32.06)
    Ca 26 (40.078)
    Mg 25 (24.305)
    Na 29 (22.990)
    Fe 35 (55.845)
muriatic acid   HCl 35 (36.45)
    Cu 41 (63.546)
    Cl 45 (35.45)
    Hg 128 (200.59)
    Pb 132 (207.2)
    Ag 138 (107.87)

Nagayasu Nawa writes and provides an explanation as how the slide rule is used:

"It is very interesting slide rule for me. Because we actually used slide rule in 1960s. There were not the electronic calculator in the world.

"I think it would be used as a simple slide rule of The Law of Definite Proportions by J.L.Proust 1799.

  • '10 water', for example, may be hydrating water in chemical compound

  • 'Chlorine' may be HClO: HCl(35) + O(10) = HClO(45), etc.

Click image to enlarge:

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1963

Royal Military College of Science Three-dimensional Spiral

From a Science Museum blog, Rajay Shah writes:

"Supported by poles and twisting around itself in a snake-like manner, this object is one of many weird and interesting forms of the periodic table. It was built at the Royal Military College of Science in 1963. The Science Museum asked for this model to be made for them to display in their new chemistry gallery after the original model was seen at an exhibition held by the Physical Society.":

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1909

Chemical News' Periodic Arrangement of the Elements

From Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, December 1909, a Periodic Arrangement of the Elements.

This formulation shows an element Np (mass 100 – Ogawa's nipponium), between Mo and Ru, a hypothesised element was later found to be the radioacive element technecium, discovered in 1937.

The formulation also has the Inactive Neutral Gases – the noble gases: St, RaEm, Z1 & Z2.

Many thanks to Sam Kidd for the tip!

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2019

Setting The Table

The journal Science gives "a visual brief history" of the periodic table, with some neat graphics showing the PT grew and changed with time. (You will need to visit the webpage to see the cool graphics inaction):

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2019

Béguyer de Chancourtois' Vis Tellurique: A Better View

The content of Béguyer de Chancourtois' Vis Tellurique decanted into a flat table.

The flattened version – prepared by Conal Boyce – shows important aspects that cannot be 'read' from the helix itself.

Click to enlarge

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2019

Heritage Periodic Table Display

By Engineered Labs, the Heritage Periodic Table Display.

"Introducing the world's first and only miniature Periodic Table with the actual elements in it.

"Over the last year, we have successfully collected each and every stable element. After considerable R&D, we have finally developed a method of embedding each element in acrylic and we have to say, the result is awesome!

"The Heritage Periodic Table pretty much speaks for itself. The collection looks great on a desk, in your hands, and anywhere else it can be displayed."



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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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