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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Periodic Table formulations from the year 2004:

2004   Electron Overjump Periodic Table
2004   Poza's Periodic Table
2004   Condiments That Go Bad Periodic Table
2004   Rouvray & King's The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century
2004   Two Hundred Languages
2004   van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict
2004   Chemical Thesaurus Periodic Table
2004   Visual Elements Periodic Table
2004   Material Type Periodic Table
2004   Elemental Hydride Types Periodic Table
2004   Elemental Oxidation States
2004   Mass Anomaly Periodic Table
2004   Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C
2004   Atomic Emission Spectra Periodic Table
2004   Organic Chemist's Periodic Table
2004   Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table
2004   Biologist's Periodic Table
2004   Wine Periodic Table
2004   Printmaking Periodic Table
2004   De Long's Wine Grape Varietal Table
2004   Dessert Periodic Table
2004   Blues Periodic Table
2004   Piano Periodic Table
2004   Cognitive Classroom's Periodic Table of Atoms
2004   Classroom Kids Periodic Table
2004   Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez


2004

Electron Overjump Periodic Table

Here are some origional periodic table ideas, including history and electron overjumpings by Oleg Aleksandrov, from here.

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2004

Rafael Poza Periodic Table (Click to Enlarge)

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2004

Condiments

A periodic table of condiment lifetimes:

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2004

Rouvray & King's The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century

D. H Rouvray and R. B. King (ed.), The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century, Research Studies Press 2004.

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2004

Periodic Tables in Two Hundred Languages

Periodic Tables of the Elements in Two Hundred Languages:

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2004

Peter van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict

Peter van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict, the web site for element names, origins (etymology) of element names and translations into other languages.

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2004

Chemical Thesaurus Periodic Table

Search for chemical reagents, atomic and molecular ions, minerals, isotopes, elemental data, etc., using the periodic table built into The Chemical Thesaurus reaction chemistry database:

By Mark Leach

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2004

Visual Elements Periodic Table

Visual Elements Periodic Table

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2004

Material Type Periodic Table

All of the the main group elements are common laboratory reagents or chemical in bottles. They appear as metals, metalloid (semi-metals) and non-metals. Most of the non-metals are molecular materials while most of the metalloids have an extended network-covalent structure.

Elsewhere in the chemogenesis web book, material type is discussed in terms of the Laing Tetrahedron, an analysis that classifies binary materials in terms of four extreme types: metallic, ionic, molecular and network. However, none the chemical elements present as ionic materials, only as metals, molecular (van er Waals) and network materials:

The elements B, C, Si, P, S, Ge, As, Se, Sn, Sb and Te can form allotropes: pure elemental substances that can exist with different crystalline structures from the Wikipedia. Allotropes may be metallic, network or molecular.

By Mark Leach

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2004

Elemental Hydride Types Periodic Table

The main group elemental hydrides are all well known reagent chemicals. The main group hydrides always give the lowest and most common oxidation state, and all chemicals are molecular in the gas phase. The Group I and II hydrides are ionic materials, but they can be vaporised to give the molecular form.

The chemicals present and behave as Lewis acids, Lewis bases or Lewis acid/base complexes, here:

By Mark Leach

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2004

Elemental Oxidation States Periodic Table

The periodic table of fluorides (mainly) shows the range of possible oxidation states. Note that lithium, by way of example, is deemed to have two oxidation states: Li0 (the metal), and Li+ (the lithium ion):

There are a few exceptions and points to note:

By Mark Leach

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2004

Mass Anomaly Periodic Table

Pairs of atoms where atomic mass does not follow atomic number.

 
Co
=
58.933  
Ni
=
58.69
 
Ar
=
39.948  
K
=
39.098
 
Te
=
127.60  
I
=
126.90

Nature's little quirk – due to the intricacies of nuclear chemistry and isotopic abundance – caused no end of difficulties to the developers of the periodic table in the mid-nineteenth century. Scientists could determine atomic mass, but knew nothing of protons or atomic numbers.

The tellurium-iodine anomaly was a particular problem.

By Mark Leach

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2004

Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C

By Mark Leach

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2004

Atomic Emission Spectra Periodic Table

Department of Chemistry at PennState has a dynamic periodic table, here, which shows the atomic emission spectra of the elements:

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2004

Organic Chemist's Periodic Table

Organic chemistry is dominated by carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. Other elements are commonly encountered in the organic lab, others less commonly and some... almost never at all...

A less than useful formulation (!):

followed by a slightly more useful organic chemist's periodic table:

By Mark Leach

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2004

Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table

Every element has a specialist, somewhere, for whom it is the most important element.

By Mark Leach

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2004

Biologist's Periodic Tables

A periodic table showing where biologically essential (green), essential trace (purple), toxic (red), radioactive (yellow) and of low – but not zero– biological impact (gray) elements are found. Only highly toxic elements are shown in red. Li (as Li+) is biologically active and is used as an antidepressant.

By Mark Leach

or here:

 

And a periodic table for biologists from Science Videos:

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2004

Wine

A Wasington State periodic table of wine types from Wines of Substance:

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2004

Printmaking

The periodic table Printmaking Project:

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2004

De Long's Wine Grape Varietal Table

here

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2004

Dessert Periodic Table

A Scientific and Rigorous approach to patisserie -- in Full Color by Andrew Plotkin (2003)

You've seen those charts that say, like, "Periodic Table of the Vegetables" or "Periodic Table of the Sausages"? They annoy me because they are not periodic. They have no vertical or horizontal correspondences. The actual periodic table of chemical elements has structure -- that's why it's cool. Thus, my contribution to the field: 

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2004

Blues Periodic Table

A Periodic Table of The Blues by Instruments For Research and Industry:

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2004

Piano Periodic Table

A Piano Periodic Table from Claude Bayeh:

Fictional Elements

Fictional Elements

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2004

Cognitive Classroom's Periodic Table of Atoms

From Cognitive Classroom, a Periodic Table of Atoms. Richard Lambrecht writes:

"We have developed a visual periodic table that groups by orbitals, making He no longer contentious. But by including an orbital cloud, we give the student a great offset to the Bohr model used to place each and every single electron in the periodic table."

Click image or here to enlarge:

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2004

Classroom Kids Periodic Table

From a paper by René Vernon, a drawing of the elements as classroom personality kids, drawing by Richard Thompson 1957-2016.

From a National Geographic coffee table book: Curt Suplee, The New Everyday Science Explained, National Geographic Society, Washington DC, p. 130 (2004). The undated credit is given to Richard Thompson.

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2004

Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez

A digitised 2004 book by book by Julio Gutiérrez-Samanez.

Julio writes:

"These matrix tables are inspired by the method used by the Peruvian chemist Oswaldo Baca Mendoza (1908-1962).

"The tables are read in this way: The Law of Formation of nuclei generates all the horizontal series Z, is dependent on n (series of integers numbers) and a constant K = 1. In the step-to-right tables (n) it will be equal to or greater than 0. In Janet's Left-Step table, (n) will be less than or equal to (-1). The values of this series Z will serve as a constant for the second law.

"The Group Formation Law or vertical series. Its generate the numeric values of the columns either from left to right or from right to left. In system A -1: With the first law: n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg = 1, 3 11, 19, 37, 55, 87 ... That is: 1H, 3Li, 11Na, 19K, 37Rb, 55Cs, 87Fr, 119, 169 ... Changing the values of n or Z, all the columns of the table will be obtained.

"In system A -2: With the first law: on the left, n = -1, then Z = 0. The vertical series Zg will be: 2He, 10Ne, 18Ar, 36Kr, 54Xe, 86Rn, 118Og, 168, 218. .. Similarly, changing the n or Z values, we can fills the columns of the table. In system B -1: With the first law: for n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg will be; 1H, 3Li, 5B, 13Al, 21Sc, 39Y, 57La, 89Ac, 121, 171 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. In system B -2: (Its mathematizes the Janet system). With the first law: on the left, for n = -1, then Z = 0.

"The vertical series Zg will be; 2He, 4Be, 12Mg, 20Ca, 38Sr, 56Ba, 88Ra, 120, 170, 220 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. The third law of the limiting the periods or periodic law, appears graphically, by comparison between rows: For example: in table B -1, in column Z = 3, after 1H and 2He, en of the first horizontal line, the value 3 appears, which is already entered in the first column as 3Li, therefore, that part of the first horizontal row (from 3 to 50) is deleted.

"The same happens with the number 5 in column 3, which is already in the first column as 5B, therefore it will be deleted in the second row from 5 to 52. The same applies to pair 13, 21 of the column Z = 9, same, with the pair 39, 57 of the column Z = 19 and of the pair 89, 121 of the column Z = 33. For that reason the periods: P are duplicated function: 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2) .... = 2, 2, 8, 8, 18, 18, 32, 32 ... and the forms are exact and staggered. The colors represent the quantum functions: s (red), p (orange), d (yellow), f (green), g (blue)."

Read the book here (in Spanish).

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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