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pre 1900 formulations
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2019 has been designated the International Year of the Periodic Table as it is the 150th Anniversary of the formulation of Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Internet Database of Periodic Tables


There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

Use the buttons below to select from the 1000+ Periodic Tables in the database:

 pre 1900 formulations  1900 to 1949 formulations  1950 to 1999 formulations  2000 to 2009 formulations    Spiral formulations  3 dimensional formulations
 Data mapping periodic tables  Miscellaneous periodic tables  Books and reviews  non-chemistry periodic tables      All periodic tables

Or, select:     Search by Year:      Text search:



The 8 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

1939     Foster's Periodic Arrangement
1970     Luder's Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements
1952     Coryell's Periodic Table in Long Form
2019     Chavhan's Third Generation Periodic Table of the Elements
1949     Catalan's Periodic System/Sistema Periodico Ampliado
1932     Bacher & Goudsmith's Periodic System and Index
2019     Janet Rejuvenated: Stewart-Tsimmerman-Nawa
2016     Mystery of Matter: Three Videos


1939

Foster's Periodic Arrangement

L.S. Foster, "Why not modernise the textbooks also? I. The periodic table", Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 409–412, https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/ed016p409

Foster writes:

"The [above] modern periodic table is simply an orderly array of the elements with all unnecessary ornamentation omitted, has been found highly satisfactory for instructional purposes.

"The transitional elements, with two unfilled electron shells, are separated from the non-metallic elements.

"The rare-earth elements, defined as those with three incomplete electron shells, are shown to be those of atomic numbers 58 to 70, while La and Lu, which have only two incomplete electron shells are classified as transitional elements.

"Copper, silver, and gold act as transitional elements except when the state of oxidation is one."

René Vernon writes:

Foster couldn't show the coinage metals – with their full d10 complements – as transitional elements, but by adding a broken line around them he was showing they had the capacity to act as if they were.

I tried to work out how he distinguished La & Lu from Ce to Yb. Foster seems to be saying that La 5d1 6s2, has incomplete 5th and 6th (ie. 6p) shells.

Same for Lu 4f14 5d1 6s2 having incomplete 5th and 6th shells. Whereas, for example, Ce 4f1 5d1 6s2 has incomplete 4th, 5th and 6th shells. Presumably this was in the years before the fact that the 4f shell became full at Yb was widely appreciated. So, strictly speaking, group 3a should have read:

On the other hand, Yb3+ has an f13 configuration, so it does meet his three unfilled shells criterion. Had he known, he probably would've put a broken line around Yb to indicate its full f14 complement but that it normally acted as a rare earth, with an incomplete 4f shell; whereas neither La nor Lu have this capacity.

Good to see Foster put so much thought into organising his table, and his experience with using it for instructional purposes.

Van Spronsen does not mention Forster's table. Mazurs has a reference to Foster's table but lumps it in with the other medium-long tables, not appreciating its subtlety.

Mark Leach writes:

This formulation is very much like the XBL 769-10601, Periodic Table Before World War II used by Seaborg and the Manhattan project and is a precursor to the modern periodic table.

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1970

Luder's Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements

W.F. Luder, The Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements, Canadian Chemical Education, April 1970, pp13-16.

Eric Scerri writes:

"A very nice article from 1970. This deals with the group 3 question in a very dear and simple fashion."

"I corresponded with the author in the 1980s. Also, I have always wondered where Jensen got some of his information for his article on group 3. I think it's from this and other articles by Luder. He published a number of articles in Journal of Chemical Education."

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1952

Coryell's Periodic Table in Long Form

Charles D. Coryell The periodic table: The 6d-5f mixed transition group, J. Chem. Educ., vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 62–64 1952.

Coryell (1912–1971), was an American chemist involved in the discovery of promethium.

René Vernon writes:

"In Coryell's table, just two elements are shown as having two solid 'tie lines':

Yttrium: to La-Ac and to Lu-Ac

Silicon: to Ti-Zr-Hf and to Ge-Sn-Pb.

"These days Ti-Zr-Hf-Rf is deemed to make-up group 4 (rightly so given group 4 is the first to exhibit characteristic transition metal properties) whereas C-Si-Ge-Sn-Pb-Fl is deemed to make-up group 14.

The solid tie lines Coryell shows between Hf-Th, Ta-Pa, and W-U would now be rendered in broken form.

If Coryell's table was mapped to a 32- or 18-column form, group 3 would presumably be shown as bifurcating after Y.

The circle around indium is possibly a typo(?): indium has two stable isotopes, In-113 (4.29%) & In-115 (95.71%)... actually, In-155 has a half-life of 4.4x1014 years."

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2019

Chavhan's Third Generation Periodic Table of the Elements

Randhir Bhavial Chavhan's Third Generation Periodic Table of the Elements poster, as presented 4th International Conference on Periodic Table at St. Petersburg, Russia.

Click here, or on the image, to enlarge:

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1949

Catalan's Periodic System/Sistema Periodico Ampliado

Two versions of Catalan's Periodic System/Sistema Periodico Ampliado. The first from C.E. Moore 1949, Atomic Energy Levels, National Bureau of Standards, Circular no. 467, Washington DC, vol. 1, table 25 (1949) and the second as referenced here: http://www.miguelcatalan.net/pdfs/bibliografia/biblio09.pdf.

Click on either image to enlarge:

Thanks to René for the tip!

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1932

Bacher & Goudsmith's Periodic System and Index

R.F. Bacher RF and S.A. Goudsmith, Atomic Energy States, McGraw-Hill, New York, p. xiii. 1932:

Thanks to René for the tip!

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2019

Janet Rejuvenated: Stewart-Tsimmerman-Nawa

An updated version of Philip Stewart's Janet Rejuvenated by Valery Tsimmerman redrawn by Nawa.

Click here to enlarge.

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2016

Mystery of Matter: Three Videos

From Alpha-Omega, three videos about the discovery of the Periodic Table.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is an exciting series about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long and continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Three episodes tell the story of seven of history's most important scientists as they seek to identify, understand and organize the basic building blocks of matter.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements shows us not only what these scientific explorers discovered but also how, using actors to reveal the creative process through the scientists' own words and conveying their landmark discoveries through re-enactments shot with replicas of their original lab equipment.

Knitting these strands together is host Michael Emerson, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor.

Meet Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, whose discovery of oxygen led to the modern science of chemistry, and Humphry Davy, who made electricity a powerful new tool in the search for elements.

Watch Dmitri Mendeleev invent the Periodic Table, and see Marie Curie's groundbreaking research on radioactivity crack open a window into the atom.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements brings the history of science to life for today's television audience.:

 

 

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Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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