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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

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Periodic Table formulations from the year 1955:

1955   Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table
1955   Mazurs' Periodic Table
1955   Krafft's Periodic Table (1955)
1955   Mazurs' 1955 Formulation
1955   Discovery of Mendelevium
1955   Element Hunters


1955

Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table

In his 1974 book Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press (2nd edition) Edward G. Mazurs presents a valence periodic table. He classifies this as a Subtype IIIC3-6a formulation:

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1955

Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table

In his 1974 book Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press (2nd edition) Edward G. Mazurs presents a periodic table he classifies as a Subtype IIIC3-6b formulation:

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1955

Krafft's Periodic Table (1955)

From The Ether and Its Vortices, p. 63, Carl Frederick Krafft

Thanks to Edmond Maurice Peyroux for the tip!

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1955

Mazurs' 1955 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1955

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1955

Discovery of Mendelevium

Md

Mendelevium, atomic number 101, has a mass of 258 au.

Synthetic radioactive element.

Mendelevium was first observed in 1955 by A. Ghiorso, G. Harvey, R. Choppin, S. G. Thompson and G. T. Seaborg.

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1955

Element Hunters

A YouTube video, The Element Hunters.

The text accompanying the video says:

"Scientist in Berkeley discover new elements [Californium & Einsteinium] from hydrogen bomb debris in 1951 and then use the 60 inch Cyclotron to create Mendelevium, element 101. The team included Nobel Prize winner Glenn Seaborg and famed element hunter, Albert Ghiorso."


Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip! 

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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