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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Periodic Table formulations from the year 2003:

2003   Chemical Galaxy II
2003   Denker's Cylinder With Bulges Periodic Table
2003   Elephant Periodic Table
2003   Visualization Methods Periodic Table
2003   Font Periodic Table
2003   Chemical & Engineering News Periodic Table
2003   Electronegativity Periodic Table
2003   Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of The Elements and Their Ions
2003   Candy, Periodic Table of
2003   Elements by Orbital
2003   Poetic Table of The Elements
2003   Electronegativity Periodic Table
2003   Proper Place for Hydrogen
2003   Ukrainian Periodic Table
2003   Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form
2003   Bird of Prey Periodic Table
2003   Eight-Group Periodic Table
2003   Discovery of Nihonium
2003   Discovery of Moscovium
2003   Two-Amphitheater Pyramid Periodic Table


2003

Philip Stewart's Chemical Galaxy II

Philip Stewart's Chemical Galaxy II periodic table formulation, from here:

Click here for a larger version.


A simplified 'chemical galaxy':

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2003

Denker's Cylinder With Bulges

John Denker fully discusses the logic behind a three dimensional periodic table that he describes as a "cylinder with bulges", here:







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2003

Elephant Periodic Table

The periodic table does not map to an elephant very well:

Click on the poster below to go to a large version:

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2003

Visualization Methods

Many visualisation methods and techniques used in science, business and technology, from pie charts to entity relationship diagrams. A large selection of these have been very neatly collected together using the periodic table as an organising metaphor. Recommended:

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2003

Font

A dingbat font by Scott Stowell and Chip Wass:

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2003

Chemical & Engineering News Periodic Table

A periodic table from C&EN with links to fascinating stories about the chemical elements:

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2003

Electronegativity Periodic Table

A periodic table showing electronegativity, "The ability of an atom to attract electron density from a covalent bond" (Linus Pauling). Blue elements are electronegative, red elements are electropositive, and purple elements are intermediate. Notice how hydrogen is intermediate in electronegativity between carbon and boron and is positioned above and between these elements:

By Mark Leach

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2003

Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of The Elements and Their Ions by Bruce Railsback, here


Click to enlarge

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2003

Candy

A periodic table of Candy, "An invaluable scientific tool brought to you by drchinese" :

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2003

Elements by Orbital

From elsewhere in Mark Leach's Chemogenesis webbook:

Madelung's Rule tells us that the orbitals fill in the order n + l (lowest first). This gives the sequence:

Electronic structure can be illustrated adding electrons to boxes (to represent orbitals). This representation shows the Pauli exclusion principle, the aufbau principle and Hund's rule in action.

There are some subtle effects with the d block elements chromium, Cr, and copper, Cu. Hund's rule of maximum multiplicity lowers the energy of the 3d orbital below that of the the 4s orbital, due to the stabilisation achieved with a complete and spherically symmetric set of five 3d orbitals containing five or ten electrons. Thus,

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2003

Poetic Table of The Elements

here

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2003

Electronegativity Periodic Table

"This image distorts the conventional periodic table of the elements so that the greater the electronegativity of an atom, the higher its position in the table", here:

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2003

Proper Place for Hydrogen in the Periodic Table

The Proper Place for Hydrogen in the Periodic Table, a paper by Marshall W. Cronyn of the Department of Chemistry, Reed College, Portlland.

Cronin writes in the Journal of Chemical Education Vol. 80, 94 -951: "After more than 130 years of construction, the place of hydrogen in the periodic table is still the subject of doubt, con- fusion, and inadequate explanation that appears to be little more than numerology..." and comes to the conclusion that hydrogen should be positioned above carbon:

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2003

Ukrainian Periodic Table

A Periodic Table from the Ukraine:

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2003

Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form

Hinsdale Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form, US Patent 7,297,000:

Roy Alexender, of the Desk Topper arrangement, has photoshopped a blurry photograph sent by Bernard along with a product mockup:

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2003

Bird of Prey Periodic Table

From Edmond (Ned) Maurice Peyroux:

"I am a self-taught, underground cartoonist - around the end of 2005 I began studying ether physics, & mid 2006 orgone biophysics. End of 2008 I was going through old note & sketch books while compiling pieces for a poetry book, & came across a sketch I did in 2003 of the first 20 elements of the periodic table in a spiral. I had just begun studying the ether vortex model of the atom & thought a vortex model of the periodicity might be a fun experiment so I played with it more. I didn't remember what inspired the original concept sketch 5 years later, but my guess was I had stayed up too late watching public television again. It probably had to do with some 4-Dimension ring concepts I was playing with, but by 2008 I was thoroughly involved in 3-D biophysics & wasn't thinking back to earlier thought experiments I had done."

"The compositions are largely artistic, naturalistic, & most are like steps on a story board, showing transformation of the table, distorting from from rectangular to spiral, then splitting between metals & noble gases like the wings of a bird, flapping, then joining again to make the spiral (then the spiral inflates to make a flower, wilts into a spider's web) - there are many transitions I have in mind, but I my work is not limited to the periodic table.":

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2003

Eight-Group Periodic Table

From Number Patterns in Nature by Jan C.A. Boeyens, Crystal Engineering 6 (2003) 167–185.

The Eight-Group Periodic Table of the 81 stable elements, in spiral form. Available sites on the prime-number cross, starting from zero, number 102.,

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

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2003

Discovery of Nihonium

Nh

Nihonium, atomic number 113, has a mass of 284 au.

Synthetic radioactive element.

Nihonium was first observed in 2003 by Y. Oganessian et al. and K. Morita et al.

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2003

Discovery of Moscovium

Mc

Moscovium, atomic number 115, has a mass of 288 au.

Synthetic radioactive element.

Moscovium was first observed in 2003 by Y. Oganessian et al.

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2003

Two-Amphitheater Pyramid Periodic Table

From Chemical Education Journal (CEJ), Vol. 7, No. 2

A Novel Way of Visualization of the Periodic Table of the Elements by Alaa El-Deen Ali Mohamed, Alexandria University, Egypt.

The author writes:

"New form of the periodic table of the elements is given in this paper. This form can be seen as two amphitheater pyramids facing each other. The cubes that meet are s-elements (interior) then the p-elements then d-elements and the f-elements at last (exterior). The table can be represented by X-, Y- and Z-axes, where the Z-axis gives the number of the period that the element occupies. The table can be modeled by colored cubes helping in introducing the periodic table to the pupils early in the primary education."

Thanks to René for the tip!

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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