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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

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Periodic Table formulations from the year 1969:

1969   Seaborg's g-Block Formulation
1969   Wikipedia Extended Periodic Table
1969   van Spronsen's The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years
1969   Island of Stability
1969   Mazurs' Periodic System of Chemical Elements
1969   van Spronsen's Periodic Table
1969   Discovery of Rutherfordium
1969   Dash's Quantum Table of the Periodic System of Elements


1969

Glen T. Seaborg's g-Block Formulation

An long periodic table – developed by Glenn T. Seaborg in 1969 – containing the yet-to-be-discovered g-block elements can be constructed. For the full version and discussion, go to Jeries Rihani's pages, here and here.

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1969

Wikipedia Extended Periodic Table

There is an extended Seaborg periodic Table on Wikipedia, here:

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1969 van Spronsen's The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years

J. W. van Spronsen, The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years, Elsevier 1969

This book gives a good review and discussion of periodic table formulations. Anybody who is seriously interested in periodic table formulations will want to see/read/own this book.

very short introduction

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1969

Island of Stability

From Wikipedia: The island of stability in nuclear physics describes a set of as-yet undiscovered isotopes of transuranium elements which are theorized to be much more stable than others. The possibility was proposed by Glenn T. Seaborg in the late 1960s: Prospectd for Further Considerable Extension of the Periodic Table, J.Chem.Educ., 46, 626-633 (1969) and reprinted in Modern Alchemy: Selected Papers of Glenn T. Seaborg (1994).

The hypothesis is that the atomic nucleus is built up in "shells" in a manner similar to the structure of the much larger electron shells in atoms. In both cases, shells are just groups of quantum energy levels that are relatively close to each other.

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1969

Mazurs Periodic System of Chemical Elements

A foldout from the Mazurs book, Graphical Representations of The Periodic System During 100 Years.

Mazurs said he drew it in 1967 and published it in 1969: ref. E Mazurs, A new numeration of periods in the periodic system and the Kessler Principle for the construction of the periodic table, Canad. Chem. Edu. 4(3), 21-23, 1969.

It is a Janet's modified system to show the irregularities – Lu, Cr, Pd etc. Click here for a larger version:

Mazurs PT

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1969

van Spronsen Periodic Table

From the van Spronsen book, The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years:

van Spronsen

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1969

Discovery of Rutherfordium

Rf

Rutherfordium, atomic number 104, has a mass of 267 au.

Synthetic radioactive element.

Rutherfordium was first observed in 1969 by A. Ghiorso et al. and I. Zvara et al.

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1969

Dash's Quantum Table of the Periodic System of Elements

Harriman H. Dash, A quantum table of the periodic system of elementsInternational Journal of Quantum Chemistry, vol. 3, no. S3A, supplement: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Solid?state Theory and Quantum Biology, 13/18 January 1969, pp. 335–340.

The abstract reads:

"The shortcomings of the long form of the periodic table of the chemical elements and the evident need for updating this format are briefly reviewed. To the question 'what format?' quantum physics provides an unequivocal answer. The foundations for the design of a quantum table are outlined. These are based on the principal quantum number as derived from the Schroedinger wave equation, the law of second order constant energy differences, and the coulomb–momentum interaction. These concepts are all combined into a single format which optimally and explicitly relates periodicity to atomic structure and the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the elements. This relationship emphasizes the unity and universality of all sciences."

Thanks to Rene for the tip!

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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