Home Page
About
Chemogenesis Web Book
Chemical Thesaurus
Tutorials and Drills
Shop
Reviews
Contact
Links
Frequently Asked Questions

pre 1900 formulations
1900 to 1949 formulations
1950 to 1999 formulations
2000 to 2009 formulations
Spiral formulations
3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables
Miscellaneous periodic tables
Books and reviews
non-chemistry periodic tables
All periodic tables

The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables


There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

Periodic Tables providing data about the chemical elements, rather than novel formulations:

2007     Theo Gray's Photographic Periodic Table
1993     WebElements: The Periodic Table on The Web
2012     94 Elements: The Stuff of Everything
2012     Abundance: Earth's Crust
2007     Abundance: Solar System
1998     American Elements
2008     American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database Periodic Table
2001     Analytical Chemist's Periodic Table
2015     Anomalous Electronic Structures
2006     Astronomer's Periodic Table
2004     Atomic Emission Spectra Periodic Table
2005     Atomic Radii Periodic Table
2013     Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table
1870     Baker's Electronegativity Table
1836     Berzelius' Electronegativity Table
2010     Bing Periodic Table
2004     Biologist's Periodic Table
2010     Cartogram Periodic Tables
2011     Chem 13 News Periodic Table Project
2003     Chemical & Engineering News Periodic Table
2010     Chemical Elements as a Collection of Images
2004     Chemical Thesaurus Periodic Table
2005     Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table
1900     Chronology of Splitting The Rare Earths: "Ceria" & "Yttria"
2016     Collective Work of Chemists
2010     Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements
2014     Correspondences Between The Classical Thomson Problem and The Periodic Table of The Elements
2013     County of Discovery Periodic Table
2012     Dates of Element Discovery
1831     Daubeny's Teaching Display Board of Atomic Weight
2009     Download Excel, Word & PDF Periodic Tables for Printing, etc.
2010     Dynamic Periodic Table
2003     Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of The Elements and Their Ions
2000     Electron Affinity
2008     Electron Slell Periodic Table
2013     Electronegativity Chart (Leach)
2003     Electronegativity Periodic Table
2013     Electronic Configuration Periodic Table
2006     Element Collection Periodic Table
2004     Element Material Type Periodic Table
2004     Elemental Hydride Types Periodic Table
2004     Elemental Oxidation States
1970     Elements According to Relative Abundance
2011     Elements in Bottles Periodic Table
2006     Elements in Fireworks
2015     Elements: A Series of Business Radio Programs/Podcasts
1987     Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements
2016     Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster
2005     Extraction from Ore to Pure Element
2005     Geologist's Periodic Table
2006     Group Numbering Systems
1919     Hackh's Periodic Chain
2004     Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table
2002     Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table
2008     Instruments, Periodic Table of
2010     Ionic Radii Database Periodic Table
2005     Ionic Radii Periodic Table
2012     iPhone, Periodic Table of
2014     IQS Periodic Tables
1969     Island of Stability
2012     IUPAC Periodic Table of The Elements
2012     IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes
2012     JR's Chemistry Set
2010     Lewis Octet Periodic Table
1963     Life Science Library Periodic Table
1995     Live! Periodic Table
2004     Mass Anomaly Periodic Table
2014     Medicinal Chemist's Periodic Table
2005     Merck Periodic Table of The Elements
2000     Metal Crystal Structure
2005     Minerals by Chemical Composition
2010     NIST Atomic Physical Reference Data
1998     NMR Nuclear Spin Periodic Table(s)
2010     Nucleosynthesis Periodic Tables
1914     Oddo-Harkins Rule
2009     Orbitron Gallery of Atomic Orbitals
2004     Organic Chemist's Periodic Table
2008     Organometallic Periodic Table
1942     Paneth's Table
1960     Pauling's Complete Electronegativity Scale
2008     Periodic Table X
2011     Periodicity Periodic Table
2004     Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C
1997     Ptable
2006     Radioactivity Periodic Table
2010     Recipe For A Human Shirt
2013     RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy
2014     Schaeffer's IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent
2012     Schematic Periodic Table of Double-Charged Cations
2013     Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table
1983     Seawater Periodic Table
2005     Smart Elements
2013     Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements
2015     STEM Sheets Printable (& Customizable) Periodic Table of Elements
2005     Student's Periodic Table
2011     Suggested Periodic Table Up To Z r 172, Based on Dirac–Fock Calculations
2006     Superconducting Elements
2015     Sweetners: a Periodic Table
2010     Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155
2014     URENCO Periodic Table
2008     Videos, Periodic Table of
2004     Visual Elements Periodic Table
2016     Where Your Elements Came From Periodic Table
1934     White's Periodic Table
1998     Wooden Periodic Table Table
2010     World's Smallest Periodic Table
1996     X-ray Absorption Edges Periodic Table


2007

Theo Gray's Photographic Periodic Table

Theodore Gray's Periodic Table.Com is a live version of what is generally regarded as the most beautiful periodic table to be developed so far. It is a treasure trove of pictures, videos and stories. Explore!

Theo is an enthusiast and a collector, and he uses the power of Mathematica (he is a co-founder of Wolfram Research) to drive his astonishing website. It is Theo's aim to be the number one periodic table resource on the web. Personally, I find Theo's website and approach to be complementary to the more academic WebElements.

 

Top of Page


1993

WebElements: The Periodic Table on The Web

As of Dec. 2012, there are 118 chemical elements, according to the excellent webelements periodic table web site:

The number of known elements does change.

The chemogenesis web book uses the WebElements periodic table as its master data source, and it does not attempt to duplicate it. These are the data fields associated with Web Elements Scholar Edition:

Abundance of elements (Earth's crust)
Abundance of elements (oceans)
Abundance of elements (sun)
Abundance of elements (Universe)
Abundance of elements (in human body)
Accurate mass of the isotopes
Atomic number
Atomic weight
Biological role
Block in periodic table
Boiling point
Bond enthalpy (diatomics)
Bond length in element
Colour (color)
Compounds
Covalent radius
Crystal structure
Density
Description
Discovery
Electrical resistivity

Electronegativities
Electronic configuration
Element bond length
Enthalpy of atomization
Enthalpy of fusion
Enthalpy of vaporization
Examples of compounds
Group name numbers
Health hazards
History of the element
Ionic radius
Ionization energy
Isolation
Isotope data
Key data
Meaning of name
Melting point
Molar volume
Names and symbols
Nuclear data
Origin of name

Oxidation states in compounds
Period in table
Properties of some compounds
Radioisotopes
Radius (atomic)
Radius (covalent)
Radius (ionic)
Radius (van der Waals)
Radius metallic (12)
Radioactive isotopes
Resistivity (electrical)
Shell structure
Standard atomic weights
Standard state
Structure of element
Thermal conductivity
Uses
Van der Waals radius
X-ray crystal structure

Top of Page


2012

94 Elements: The Stuff of Everything

There are 94 naturally occuring elements, from hydrogen to plutonium. Together they make up everything in the world.

94 Elements is a global filmmaking project, exploring our lives through the lens of the elements. Everything that surrounds us is made from these 94 building blocks, each with its own properties and personality. Our own bodies are mostly made from just 6 of them.

The stories of the elements are the stories of our own lives. They reveal the patterns of our economies and the state of our relationships with our natural resources. The project is in part a celebration of the art of documentary film and some of the best filmmakers working today are making new films for the project. There'll also be opportunities for talented new and emerging filmmakers and animators to pitch their own films, with the winners chosen by you - the project community.

Top of Page


2012

Abundance: Earth's Crust

From Mark Winter's WebElements an infographic of the abundance of elements in the Earth's crust by weight:

Fictional Elements

Top of Page


2007

Abundance: Solar System

From Wikipedia, a chart of Solar System Abundances:

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

Top of Page


1998

American Elements

Supplier & Element Industrial Information: American Elements

Top of Page


2008

American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database Periodic Table

A periodic table front end to the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database.

Clicking on an element gives access to the database searches. Conveniently, sets of elements can be selected or excluded:

American Mineralogist

Top of Page


2001

Analytical Chemist's Periodic Table

This PT gives information about storage and analysis of the elements.

Top of Page


2015

Anomalous Electronic Structures

Eric Scerri has supplied two periodic tables showing "anomalous configurations for gas phase atoms, highlighted in yellow, and for condensed phase atoms, purple." (The f-block anomalies for condensed phase are yet to be calculated.)

Read more in Eric's short article for the RSC.

Anomalous Electronic Structures

Anomalous Electronic Structures

Top of Page


2006

Astronomer's Periodic Table

Highly amusing for chemists is the astronomer's periodic table because astronomers consider there to be three types of element:

  • hydrogen
  • helium
  • metal

    Yup, cosmologists and other professional star gazers consider all elements, atomic number three and up, to be metals.

Top of Page


2004

Atomic Emission Spectra Periodic Table

Department of Physics had a dynamic periodic table, here, which showed the atomic spectra of all the elements... but the link seems to be broken:

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

Top of Page


2005

Atomic Radii Periodic Table

Top of Page


2013

Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table

By Leland Allen, a representation of the periodic table with the third dimension of energy derived from the averaged ionisation potentials of the s and p electrons. (Allen suggested that this was a direct measure of electronegativity). From J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1989, 111, 9004:

Averaged Ionisation Potential

Top of Page


1870

Baker's Electronegativity Table

Baker's electronegativity table of 1870 differs from Berzelius' listing of 1836 only by the addition of the newly discovered elements. Page 280 and ref. 5 from Bill Jensen's: Electronegativity from Avogadro to Pauling Part II: Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Developments, J. Chem. Educ., 80, 279-287 (2003):

Top of Page


1836

Berzelius' Electronegativity Table

Berzelius' electronegativity table of 1836.

The most electronegative element (oxygen or Sauerstoff) is listed at the top left and the least electronegative (potassium or Kalium) lower right. The line between hydrogen (Wasserstoff) and gold seperates the predomently electronegative elements from the electropositive elements. Page 17 and ref. 32 from Bill Jensen's Electronegativity from Avogadro to Pauling Part I: Origins of the Electronegativity Concept, J. Chem. Educ., 73, 11-20 (1996):

Top of Page


2010

Bing Periodic Table

Microsoft's Bing search engine has a rather extensive way of finding element data & information that avoids any formal PT representation:

Top of Page


2004

Biologist's Periodic Tables

A periodic table showing where biologically essential (green), essential trace (purple), toxic (red), radioactive (yellow) and of low – but not zero– biological impact (gray) elements are found. Only highly toxic elements are shown in red. Li (as Li+) is biologically active and is used as an antidepressant.

or here:

 

And a periodic table for biologists from Science Videos:

Top of Page


2010

Cartogram Periodic Tables

Webelements have produced a poster with various atomic & elemental properties represented in cartographic form.

From the Webelements shop: "Periodic table cartograms are periodic table grids distorted using a computer algorithm so that the areas of the element squares are in proportion to a periodic table property. This is the first poster to show periodic properties plotted in this way".

Top of Page


2011

Chem 13 News Periodic Table Project

The Chem 13 News Periodic Table Project celebrates the International Year of Chemistry in 2011.

This collaborative periodic table is designed by chemistry students from all Canadian provinces and territories, 20 US states and 14 different countries. Chem 13 News readers registered their chemistry students to artistically interpret one element. Combined these tiles form one innovative and unique periodic table. A poster of the table and a traveling display are currently being constructed.

Top of Page


2003

Chemical & Engineering News Periodic Table

A periodic table from C&EN with links to fascinating stories about the chemical elements:

Top of Page


2010

Chemical Elements as a Collection of Images

Using Google Translate (German -> English):

"The periodic table of chemical elements as a collection of images [click to zoom in]. A collection of images of materials constitute the basic components of the whole universe. This is a periodic table of chemical elements (also called short PSE) with a difference! Visible in pure form, as it really looks like. Not only naked dry boring data. There are the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, boron group, carbon group, nitrogen group, chalcogens, halogens, noble gases, hard metals, ferrous metals, precious metals, lanthanides..." from the website, here:

Top of Page


2004

Chemical Thesaurus Periodic Table

Search for chemical reagents, atomic and molecular ions, minerals, isotopes, elemental data, etc., using the periodic table built into The Chemical Thesaurus reaction chemistry database:

Top of Page


2005

Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table

A periodic table front end to the Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table. Clicking on an element gives access to database searches of chemical species and their interactions.

A quote neatly sums up what the ChemThes reaction chemistry database project is trying to achieve:

"The Chemical Thesaurus is a reaction chemistry information system that extends traditional references by providing hyperlinks between related information. The program goes a long way toward meeting its ambitious goal of creating a nonlinear reference for reaction information. With its built-in connections, organizing themes, and multiple ways to sort and view data, The Chemical Thesaurus is much greater than the sum of the data in its database.

"The program does an excellent job of removing the artificial barriers between different subdisciplinary areas of chemistry by presenting a unified vision of inorganic and organic reaction chemistry."

K.R. Cousins, JACS, 123, 35, pp 8645-6 (2001)

Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database

Top of Page


1900

Chronology of Splitting The Rare Earths: "Ceria" & "Yttria"

Chronology of the splitting of "ceria" (mixed oxides) in the different composing rare-earth elements:

Chronology of the splitting of "yttria" (mixed oxides) in the different composing rare-earth elements:

 

From: CRC Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, Chapter 248. Accommodation of the Rare Earths in the Periodic Table: A Historical Analysis by Pieter Thyssen and Koen Binnemans (ISBN: 978-0-444-53590-0)

Top of Page


2016

Collective Work of Chemists

From an article on LinkedIn:

Twelve elements were known from the Ancient Times, and were described by Romans and Greeks. The remaining 106 elements have been discovered by scientists of 15 different countries during the last 4 centuries. In addition, 19 elements of those 106 (18%) have been co-discovered by researchers of two countries.

Although some of them (like Bromine or Thallium) were isolated separately at the same time by chemists of different nationalities within the race to discover new elements in 18th-21st centuries, most of them have been obtained since then through collaborative research, like the recently discovered Ununpentium, Ununseptium and Ununoctium.

Another example is the isolation of Radium and Polonium by the Polish Maria Skłodowska-Curie and her French husband, Pierre Curie.

Thus, Periodic Table is the result of a collective and long-term work of hundreds of scientists.

It is noteworthy to see that Russia and United States have discovered mainly artificial elements.

Collective Work of Chemists

Collective Work of Chemists

Top of Page


2010

Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements

Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic weight uncertainties.

Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements in Naturally Occurring Terrestrial Materials and Reagents

This report is available as a pdf.

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Water Resources Investigation Report 01-4222

Top of Page


2014

Correspondences Between The Classical Thomson Problem and The Periodic Table of The Elements

By Tim (TJ) LaFave, a very detailed pdf discussing the correspondences between the classical Thomson Problem and the Periodic Table of the Elements. You will need to click thru and zoom in:

classical Thomson Problem and the Periodic Table

Top of Page


2013

County of Discovery Periodic Table

Jamie Gallagher – scientist, engineer, science communicator, salsa teacher and part time comic – has produced a periodic table showing the county of origin of the discoverer:

County of Discovery Periodic Table

Top of Page


2012

Dates of Element Discovered

The Elements and their dates of discovery, taken from this Wikipedia page:









Top of Page


1831

Daubeny's Teaching Display Board of Atomic Weights

The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, has a display of Charles Daubeny's teaching materials from 1831, including a black painted wooden board with "SYMBOLS OF SIMPLE BODIES": symbols, atomic weights and names of elements in two columns, and a small pile of cubes with element symbol.

Note that some of the numbers seem very strange to our eyes: carbon is given as 6 (rather than 12) and oxygen 8 (not 16), while others correspond with modern values remarkably well, chlorine is given as 36 rather than 35.5.

Daubeny's weights (along with the modern mass) are given:

Daubeny's SYMBOLS OF SIMPLE BODIES (1831)
O 8 (16.0) Oxygen K 40 (39.1) Potassium
Cl 36 (35.5) Chlorine Na 24 (23.0) Sodium
Fl 19 (19.0) Fluorine Ca 20 (40.1) Calcium
B 80 (79.9) Bromine Mg 12 (24.3) Magnesium
I 124 (127) Iodine Si 8 (28.1) Silicon
H 1 (1.01) Hydrogen Al 10 (27.0) Aluminium
N 14 (14.0) Nitrogen Fe 28 (55.8) Iron
C 6 (12.0) Carbon Cu 64 (63.5) Copper
S 16 (32.1) Sulphur Pb 104 (207) Lead
P 16 (31.0) Phosphorus Hg 200 (200.6) Mercury

Check out the virtual tour of the museum, here. The display of Daubeny's teaching materials can be found in the basement, here.

Top of Page


2009

Download Excel, Word & PDF Periodic Tables for Printing, etc.

A periodic table in Excel spreadsheet format by Jeff Bigler of Waltham HS:

An excellent and detailed Two Page .pdf Periodic Table from Consol:

Top of Page


2010

Dynamic Periodic Table

Michael Dayah's Dynamic Periodic Table, in development since 1997, is a traditional data presentation periodic table with a beautiful, flexible & fast user interface.

For example, when selecting "MP", "BP", "Discovery", etc. a slider appears and the PT changes in colour dynamically to reflect the change. PDF and PNG versions can be downloaded:

Highly recommended!

Top of Page


2003

Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of The Elements and Their Ions by Bruce Railsback, here


Click to enlarge

Top of Page


2000

Electron Affinity

In chemistry and atomic physics, the electron affinity of an atom is defined as the energy change when an electron is added to a neutral atom to form a negative ion:

M  +   e    —>    M   +   energy:

Kabbalistic

Top of Page


2008

Electron Slell Periodic Table

A Wikipedia Periodic Tables of the Elements showing the Electron Shells:

 

Top of Page


2013

Electronegativity Chart (Leach)

From Mark R Leach's paper, Concerning electronegativity as a basic elemental property and why the periodic table is usually represented in its medium form, Journal & PDF.

Due to the importance of Pauling's electronegativity scale, as published in The Nature of The Chemical Bond (1960), where electronegativity ranges from Cs 0.7 to F 4.0, all the other electronegativity scales are routinely normalised with respect to Pauling's range.

When the Pauling, Revised Pauling, Mulliken, Sanderson and Allred-Rochow electronegativity scales are plotted together against atomic number, Z, the similarity of the data can be observed. The solid line shows the averaged data:

Top of Page


2003

Electronegativity Periodic Table

A periodic table showing electronegativity, "The ability of an atom to attract electron density from a covalent bond" (Linus Pauling). Blue elements are electronegative, red elements are electropositive, and purple elements are intermediate. Notice how hydrogen is intermediate in electronegativity between carbon and boron and is positioned above and between these elements:

Top of Page


2013

Electronic Configuration Periodic Table

From the Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins, page 1407 published by Springer, 2013 (ISBN: 978-1-4614-1532-9) a periodic table of electronic configurations:

Electronic Configuration  Periodic Table

Top of Page


2006

Element Collection Periodic Table

It is possible to buy sets of elements presented as a periodic table from RGB Research Ltd.

Top of Page


2004

Element Material Type Periodic Table

All of the the main group elements are common laboratory reagents or chemical in bottles. They appear as metals, metalloid (semi-metals) and non-metals. Most of the non-metals are molecular materials while most of the metalloids have an extended network-covalent structure.

Elsewhere in the chemogenesis web book, material type is discussed in terms of the Laing Tetrahedron, an analysis that classifies binary materials in terms of four extreme types: metallic, ionic, molecular and network. However, none the chemical elements present as ionic materials, only as metals, molecular (van er Waals) and network materials:

The elements B, C, Si, P, S, Ge, As, Se, Sn, Sb and Te can form allotropes: pure elemental substances that can exist with different crystalline structures from the Wikipedia. Allotropes may be metallic, network or molecular.

Top of Page


2004

Elemental Hydride Types Periodic Table

  • Ionic or Salt-Like Hydrides: Molten LiH conducts electricity and hydrogen gas is liberated at the anode confirming presence of hydride ion H. The crystal structures show an ionic lattice, and not an LiH molecular lattice.
  • Covalent Hydrides are formed by the p-Bolock elements.
  • Metallic or Interstitial Hydrides are formed by many d-block and f-block elements when heated with hydrogen under pressure. The hydrides tend to be non-stoichiometric and they may be of variable composition.
  • There is a Hydride Gap where elements do not form hydrides. This roughly maps to the Siderophile Elements of the geologist's periodic table (below).
  • The Intermediate Hydrides do not fit: beryllium hydride is polymeric, (BeH2)n. Others have properties between metallic and covalent.

The main group elemental hydrides are all well known reagent chemicals. The main group hydrides always give the lowest and most common oxidation state, and all chemicals are molecular in the gas phase. The Group I and II hydrides are ionic materials, but they can be vaporised to give the molecular form.

The chemicals present and behave as Lewis acids, Lewis bases or Lewis acid/base complexes, here:

Top of Page


2004

Elemental Oxidation States Periodic Table

The periodic table of fluorides (mainly) shows the range of possible oxidation states. Note that lithium, by way of example, is deemed to have two oxidation states: Li0 (the metal), and Li+ (the lithium ion):

There are a few exceptions and points to note:

  • There is a general increase in the number of possible oxidation states towards the lower right hand side of the periodic table.
  • Nitrogen(V) fluoride, NF5, is not known, but the nitrogen(V) oxide is: N2O5.
  • PtBr2 and PtBr3 are known, but PtF2 and PtF3 are not.
  • All elements are known in the zero oxidation state, but apart from: He, Ne & Ar, and these are not shown in the diagram below.
  • All data is from WebElements.

Top of Page


1970

Elements According to Relative Abundance

A 1970 periodic table by Prof. Wm. F. Sheehan of the University of Santa Clara that claims to show the elements according to relative abundance at the Earth's surface.

Click here to see the full size version with a little more text:

 

However, this author disputes the relative areas given to the various elements; there is almost no helium at the Earth's surface, for example.

Below is a conventional PT representation of the relative abundance of the elements in the Earth's crust taken from Mark Winter's WebElements website:

Top of Page


2011

Elements in Bottles Periodic Table

A nice web site with a physical periodic table of elements:

Top of Page


2006

Elements in Fireworks

Fireworks rely on the chemical characteristics of the elements that are used to make them. This special periodic table highlights the elements that have significance to fireworks and pyrotechnics:

Top of Page


2015

Elements: A Series of Business Radio Programs/Podcasts

A series of BBC World Service Radio Programs, available as MP3 Podcasts, talking about the chemical elements with a strong business/technology bias, rather than the more usual chemical or historical approach:

Quantum Fold Periodic Table

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

Top of Page


1987

Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements

Prepared by P. Lof is Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements.

This educational wall chart features the periodic table of the elements supported by a wealth of chemical, physical, thermodynamical, geochemical and radiochemical data laid down in numerous colourful graphs, plots, figures and tables. The most important chemical and physical properties of the elements can be found - without turning a page.

All properties are presented in the form of tables or graphs. More than 40 properties are given, ranging from melting point and heat capacity to atomic radius, nuclear spin, electrical resistivity and abundance in the solar system. Sixteen of the most important properties are colour coded, so that they may be followed through the periodic system at a glance. Twelve properties have been selected to illustrate periodicity, while separate plots illustrate the relation between properties. In addition, there are special sections dealing with units, fundamental constants and particles, radioisotopes, the Aufbau principle, etc. All data on the chart are fully referenced, and S.I. units are used throughout.

Designed specifically for university and college undergraduates and high school students, "Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements" will also be of practical value to professionals in the fields of fundamental and applied physical sciences and technology. The wall chart is ideally suited for self-study and may be used as a complementary reference for textbook study and exam preparation.

  • atomic number
  • standard atomic weight
  • ground-state electronic configuration
  • element symbol
  • element name
  • discoverer and year of discovery
  • melting point; boiling point
  • critical temperature
  • molar enthalpy of atomization
  • molar enthalpy of fusion
  • molar enthalpy of vaporization
  • atomic energy levels of the outermost three orbitals
  • formal oxidation states
  • selection of standard reduction potentials
  • first, second & third molar ionization energies
  • Pauling electronegativity
  • Allred-Rochow electronegativity
  • molar electron affinity
  • molar volume
  • crystal structures
  • polymorphic transition temperatures
  • atomic radius
  • effective ionic radii
  • volumic mass (density)
  • electrical resistivity
  • thermal conductivity
  • abundance in the solar system
  • abundance in the Orgueil meteorite
  • abundance in the solar photosphere
  • abundance in the continental crust
  • abundance in the primitive mantle
  • abundance in the oceanic crust
  • naturally occurring isotopes
  • mass number and representative isotopic composition
  • molar heat capacity
  • Debye temperature
  • coefficient of linear thermal expansion
  • price; annual mining production
  • world reserve base
  • nuclear spin and NMR receptivity
  • Mossbauer active nuclides
  • physical (standard) state
  • metallic character
  • abundance in food (human daily intake)
  • principal hazardous property
  • Other information: Aufbau principle, quantum numbers, orbitals and sequence of orbital filling; trivial group names; drawings of crystal lattice structures; 12 plots of a chemical/physical property against atomic number; 9 plots of a property against another property; list of SI units and SI prefixes; list of other units and their conversion to SI; list of fundamental physical constants; scheme of fundamental particles; list of radioisotopes with half-life longer than 5 days, presenting half-life and mode(s) of decay, indicating cosmogenic isotopes and isotopes produced by U-235 fission, as well as radioisotopes used in geochronology, pharmacology and nuclear medicine.



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

Top of Page


2016

Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster

Tom Field, President, Field Tested Systems, LLC and Contributing Editor, Sky & Telescope Magazine says: "We have complete redesigned our Emission Spectra of the Elements Poster and put it up for sale."

A couple of links:

www.fieldtestedsystems.com - classroom gas-tube spectroscopy
www.rspec-astro.com - astronomical spectroscopy
Sky & Telescope

Emission Spectra

Top of Page


2005

Extraction from Ore to Pure Element

A periodic table showing how pure elements are extracted:

Highly electropositive elements (Na, K) and electronegative elements (Cl2, F2) can only be obtained by electrolysis.

Top of Page


2005 Geologist's Periodic Table

Atmophile Elements - noble gases and covalently bonded gaseous molecules. The atoms and molecules are attracted by weak van der Waals forces and so these elements remain gaseous at room temperature.

Lithophile Elements - Those elements which form ionic bonds generally have filled outer electron shells. They typically bond to oxygen in silicates and oxides.

Siderophile Elements - The metals near iron in the periodic table that exhibit metallic bonding, have a weak affinity for oxygen and sulfur and are readily soluble in molten iron. Examples include iron, nickel, cobalt, platinum, gold, tin, and tantalum. These elements are depleted in the earth crust because they have partitioned into the earth's iron core.

Chalcophile Elements - The elements that bond to S, Se, Te, Sb, and As. These bonds are predominantly covalent in character.

As discussed in more detail here.

Top of Page


2006

Group Numbering Systems

IUPAC


Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C

Top of Page


1919

Hackh's Periodic Chain

From a Scientific American in March 1919, an article by Ingo W. D. Hackh discussing the classification of the elements.

Included is a periodic chain showing the redox states of the elements:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Top of Page


2004

Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table

Every element has a specialist, somewhere, for whom it is the most important element.

Top of Page


2002

Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table

An Inorganic Chemist's Periodic Table by Geoff Rayner-Canham, here. This PT was used on the cover of Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry, Third Edition.

The major links in the Periodic Table are those of the Groups and Periods. There are other patterns:

  • The (n) and (n+10) groups linkages (grey)
  • The diagonal relationships (green)
  • The "knights move" relationships (tan)
  • The aluminum-iron link (red)
  • The lanthanoid and actinoid relationships (grey)
  • The "combo" elements (violet)
  • The "pseudo" elements (blue)

Top of Page


2008

Instruments, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of various scientific instruments and techniques from Thermo Scientific and C&EN.

Download, zoom in & explore the interesting pdf file:

Top of Page


2010

Ionic Radii Database Periodic Table

By the Atomistic Simulation Group in the Materials Department of Imperial College, a database of ionic radii:

Genetic Code Periodic Table

Top of Page


2005

Ionic Radii Periodic Table

Top of Page


2012

iPhone, Periodic Table of

An article in Scientific American Digging for Rare Earths: The Mines Where iPhones Are Born.

"About 60 miles southwest of Las Vegas, in a mine some 500 feet deep, the beginnings of an iPhone come to life. But the sleek, shiny iPhone is far, far removed from the rocks pulled out of this giant hole, which looks like a deep crater on the moon. Inside the rocks from this mine are rare-earth minerals, crucial ingredients for iPhones, as well as wind turbines, hybrid cars, and night-vision goggles. Minerals such as neodymium are used in magnets that make speakers vibrate to create sound. Europium is a phosphor that creates a bright red on an iPhone screen. Cerium gets put into a solvent that workers use to polish devices as they move along the assembly line, etc.":

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Top of Page


2014

IQS Periodic Tables

By Jordi Cuadros, a set of three pairs of periodic tables in Catalan, English & Spanish pointing out the differences between PT representations of atoms and PT representations of the material substances:

IQS Periodic Table

Top of Page


1969

Island of Stability

From Wikipedia: The island of stability in nuclear physics describes a set of as-yet undiscovered isotopes of transuranium elements which are theorized to be much more stable than others. The possibility was proposed by Glenn T. Seaborg in the late 1960s: Prospectd for Further Considerable Extension of the Periodic Table, J.Chem.Educ., 46, 626-633 (1969) and reprinted in Modern Alchemy: Selected Papers of Glenn T. Seaborg (1994).

The hypothesis is that the atomic nucleus is built up in "shells" in a manner similar to the structure of the much larger electron shells in atoms. In both cases, shells are just groups of quantum energy levels that are relatively close to each other.

Top of Page


2012

IUPAC Periodic Table of The Elements

The 2012 IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) Periodic Table of The Elements showing the recently named elements: Fl (flerovium, 114) and Lv (livermorium, 116).

This version is dated 1 June 2012. For updates to this table, go here.

Top of Page


2012

IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes

The Periodic Table of the Isotopes, published by International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), is now available from the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights, which is a commission under the Inorganic Division (Division II) of IUPAC.

The text identifies four types of atom, with respect to isotopes:

  • Element has two or more isotopes that are used to determine its standard atomic weight. The isotopic abundances and atomic weights vary in natural terrestrial substances. These variations are well known, and the standard atomic weight is given as lower and upper bounds within square brackets, [ ].

  • Element has two or more isotopes that are used to determine its standard atomic weight. The isotopic abundances and atomic weights vary in natural terrestrial substances, but upper and lower bounds of the standard atomic weight have not been assigned by IUPAC or the variations may be too small to affect the standard atomic weight value. Thus, the standard atomic weight is given as a single value with an uncertainty that includes both measurement uncertainty and uncertainty due to variations in isotopic abundances.

  • Element has only one isotope that is used to determine its standard atomic weight. Thus, the standard atomic weight is invariant and is given as a single value with an IUPAC evaluated measurement uncertainty.

  • Element has no standard atomic weight because all of its isotopes are radioactive and, in natural terrestrial substances, no isotope occurs with a characteristic isotopic abundance from which a standard atomic weight can be determined.

Top of Page


2012

JR's Chemistry Set

For the iPhone and iPad, JR's Chemistry Set makes chemistry interesting and fun to learn. Based upon the innovative Rota Period, it is a handy and powerful reference tool for chemistry enthusiasts and practitioners at all ages and all levels.

Top of Page


2010

Lewis Octet Periodic Table

A periodic table showing the outer shell of valence electrons associated with Lewis atoms:

Top of Page


1963

Life Science Library Periodic Table

An periodic table in the Life Science Library book, Matter, by Ralph E. Lapp (1963).

The PT is arranged vertically instead of having the usual horizontal format. It is also probably the first book to show pictures of nearly every element, arranged by family:

Top of Page


1995

Periodic Table Live!

A good site with lots of infomation, pictures & video clips, here:

Top of Page


2004

Mass Anomaly Periodic Table

Pairs of atoms where atomic mass does not follow atomic number.

 
Co
=
58.933  
Ni
=
58.69
 
Ar
=
39.948  
K
=
39.098
 
Te
=
127.60  
I
=
126.90

Nature's little quirk – due to the intricacies of nuclear chemistry and isotopic abundance – caused no end of difficulties to the developers of the periodic table in the mid-nineteenth century. Scientists could determine atomic mass, but knew nothing of protons or atomic numbers.

The tellurium-iodine anomaly was a particular problem.

Top of Page


2014

Medicinal Chemist's Periodic Table

From In The Pipeline, a blog posting about a [free, full access] review entitled, Exploration of the medical periodic table: towards new targets.

  • Element symbols in white are known to be essential in man.
  • The ones with a blue background are found in the structures of known drugs.
  • The orange ones are used in diagnostics.
  • The green ones are medically useful radioisotopes.
  • The paper notes that titanium and tantalum are coloured blue due to their use in implants.

Phobia

Phobia

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

Top of Page


2005

Merck Periodic Table of The Elements

The Merck periodic table of the elements, here:

Top of Page


2000

Metal Crystal Structure Periodic Table

Developed from Dr S.J. Heyes' First Year Inorganic Chemistry lecture notes (Oxford University):

Top of Page


2005

Minerals by Chemical Composition

Lists minerals by percent element. From the excellent webmineral mineralogy database:

Top of Page


2010

NIST Atomic Physical Reference Data

Access the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) physical reference data:

Top of Page


1998

NMR Nuclear Spin Periodic Table(s)

An nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy periodic table giving information the nuclear spins, etc., of the chemical elements, from the Bruker corporation website:

And, another:

 

The range of NMR active nuclei observable on a particular instrument is, in part, a function of the configuration of the spectrometer and the choice of available probes. The periodic tables below identify the nuclei that have resonance frequencies within the detection range of the Lake Forest College Inova and the EFT-60 NMR spectrometers.

The nuclei in red are I=1/2 and yield spectra with narrow, non-overlapping resonances. The nuclei in blue have quadrapolar moments and may give rise to broad or very broad resonances in their spectra.

Top of Page


2010

Nucleosynthesis Periodic Tables

The buildup of heavy elements from lighter ones by nuclear fusion.

Helium, and some lithium, was produced by cosmic (or primordial) nucleosynthesis from 2 to 20 minitues after the Big Bang, here and here:

From the Encyclopedia of Science:

Today most element-building nucleosynthesis takes place in stars.

Stellar nucleosynthesis converts hydrogen into helium, either by the proton-proton chain or by the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle. As a star evolves, a contracting superdense core of helium is produced from the conversion of hydrogen nuclei into helium nuclei.

Eventually, the temperature and pressure inside the core become high enough for helium to begin fusing into carbon. If the star has more than about twice the Sun's mass, a sequence of nuclear reactions then produces heavier elements such as oxygen, silicon, magnesium, potassium, and iron. Successively heavier elements, as far as iron (in the most massive stars) are built up in later stages of stellar evolution by the triple-alpha process. The heaviest elements of all are produced by explosive nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions, by mechanisms such as the p-process, r-process, and s-process:

From FigShare (Athanasios Psaltis):

Our quest to explain the origin of the elements started in the late 1950's by two famous papers independently - E. M. Burbidge et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 29, 547 (1957) & A.G.W. Cameron, Pub. Astron. Soc. Pac. 69, 201 (1957) - whose authors claimed that the elements are created in astrophysical environments. This is the well-known periodic table of elements, but where each element is labeled by the environment that is created (e.g Supernova explosion etc.).

Top of Page


1914

Oddo-Harkins Rule

The Oddo–Harkins rule holds that elements with an even atomic number (such as carbon) are more common than elements with an odd atomic number (such as nitrogen). This effect on the abundance of the chemical elements was first reported by Giuseppe Oddo in 1914 and William Draper Harkins in 1917. See the Wikipedia page:

Oddo-Harkin's rule

Top of Page


2009

Orbitron Gallery of Atomic Orbitals

The Orbitron gallery of atomic orbitals is a poster available from Mark Winter's Web Elements:

The orbitron web page is here.

Top of Page


2004

Organic Chemist's Periodic Table

Organic chemistry is dominated by carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. Other elements are commonly encountered in the organic lab, others less commonly and some... almost never at all...

A less than useful formulation (!):

followed by a slightly more useful organic chemist's periodic table:

Top of Page


2008

Organometallic Periodic Table

Wikipedia has pages on many types of organometallic compound, and a periodic table for accessing these organometallic pages, such as the one below (which happens to be on the organotin page):

Top of Page


1942

Paneth's Table

Published by Paneth in 1942 in an article in Nature in which he suggests that newly discovered elements such as Z = 43 should be given names by their discoverers. The other highlighted elements (below) had also not yet been named.

Element 43 had been discovered 9 years earlier but had not been given an official name because there was reluctance to consider synthetic elements on the same footing as naturally occurring ones. This changed as a result of Paneth's article.

For more information see Eric Scerri's, A Tale of Seven Elements, OUP, 2013.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Top of Page


1960

Pauling's Complete Electronegativity Scale

From The Nature of The Chemical Bond, 3rd Ed, pp 93, Pauling gives a periodic table showing the electronegativity of the elements.

Notice how the d block appears between groups 3 and 4 (13 & 14), rather than between groups 2 and 3 (2 & 13):

Top of Page


2008

Periodic Table X

Periodic Table X is a periodic table for the Macintosh.

Top of Page


2011

Periodicity Periodic Table

From Wikipedia, a PT showing the main periodic trends:

Wikipedia periodicity

Top of Page


2004

Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C

Top of Page


1997

Ptable

Ptable is an excellent, data filled, dynamic periodic table with an intuitive and flexible interface, available in 50 languages:

Top of Page


2006

Radioactivity Periodic Table

A periodic table showing the elements that have no stable isotopes, so that all samples are radioactive:

Top of Page


2010

Recipe For A Human Shirt

By Sean Fallon and available from Fashionably Geek, A Recipe For Humans Shirt:

Top of Page


2013

RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy

From the RSC Website: "Alchemists are often described as the first chemists. They developed an extraordinary language (rather than the chemical symbols we use today) to describe all manner of things, from chemical reactions to philosophical tenets. Click on ‘What is Alchemy?’ to learn about the three aims of the alchemists. Click on each of the alchemical symbols for more information and to see alternative symbols."

Top of Page


2014

Schaeffer's IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent

IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent, Bernard Schaeffer, Journal of Modern Physics, Vol. 5, No. 3, February 24, 2014
DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2014.53020

Abstract: Most periodic tables of the chemical elements are between 96% and 100% in accord with quantum mechanics. Three elements only do not fit correctly into the official tables, in disagreement with the spherical harmonics and the Pauli exclusion principle. Helium, belonging to the s-block, should be placed beside hydrogen in the s-block instead of the p-block. Lutetium and lawrencium belonging to the d-block of the transition metals should not be in the f-block of the lanthanides or the actinoids. With these slight modifications, the IUPAC table becomes quantum mechanics consistent.

IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent

Top of Page


2012

Schematic Periodic Table of Double-Charged Cations

N. S. Imyanitov / The Periodic Law. Formulations, Equations, Graphic Representations, Russian Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 56 (14), 2183 - 2200, 2011 (In English), DOI: 10.1134/S0036023611140038

Top of Page


2013

Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table

From Scientific American, The Elements Revealed: An Interactive Periodic Table.

Many elements have links with articles on individual elements which first appeared in Nature Chemistry and were not previously available on-line:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Top of Page


1983

Seawater Periodic Table

A periodic table of references to analytical chemistry papers associated with the elements. If you want to know how much gallium in seawater, this would be a good place to start:

Top of Page


2005

Smart Elements

Smart Elements, at smart-elements.com, is a company selling physical samples of chemical elements for research, education & collection.

  • High purity Elements for Science, Laboratory and Education
  • High-End element samples for collectors, museums, lectures and exhibitions
  • Free picture service for educational purposes
  • Professional advisory service
  • Purchase of Elements

Smart Elements sell numerous examples of all the naturally occuring elements. For example they sell 26 copper, Cu, products including samples in acrylic blocks, vials and bottles:

Top of Page


2013

Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

A Spider Chart linking together various ideas about the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements by Roy Alexander (of Alexander Arrangement fame).

Click here to embiggen the image:

Spider Chart

Top of Page


2015

STEM Sheets Printable (& Customizable) Periodic Table of Elements

From STEM Sheets – where "STEM" stands for Science, Technology Engineering & Maths – a customizable and printable periodic table.

Printable Features

  • Include names, symbols, atomic numbers, weights, periods, groups, electrons/shell
  • Include Lutetium (Lu) and Lawrencium (Lr) in the d-block if desired
  • Related elements are color coded
  • Print in color or black and white
  • Print in A4 or US Letter page sizes

Top of Page


2005

Student's Periodic Table

Students are expected to know that in all equations hydrogen is molecular should [nearly always] be written as H2. Likewise, nitrogen is N2, oxygen O2, fluorine F2, chlorine Cl2, bromine Br2 and iodine I2. But somehow students are expected to know that molecular sulfur, S8, should be written as S and molecular phosphorus, P4, should be written as P.

Top of Page


2011

Suggested Periodic Table Up To Z ≤ 172, Based on Dirac–Fock Calculations

A suggested periodic table up to Z ≤ 172, based on Dirac–Fock calculations on atoms and ions
Pekka Pyykkö
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011,13, 161-168
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP01575J

Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac–Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements.

[This new] Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121–164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MXi compounds:

Top of Page


2006

Superconducting Elements

A periodic table showing which elements become superconducting at low temperature.

Top of Page


2015

Sweetners: a Periodic Table

A guide to sweeteners By Patterson Clark and Lazaro Gamio, Published: March 2, 2015

Too much sugar can be detrimental to health, rotting teeth, building fat, damaging blood vessels and stressing out the system that regulates blood sugar. Some people turn to artificial sweeteners, but those are under increasing suspicion of creating metabolic problems, such as diabetes and obesity.

Natural alternative sweeteners exist, but even they have pitfalls if consumed in excess.

This sweetners periodic table below, click to enbiggen, charts the wide variety of sweeteners available in the United States, either in bulk amounts or as additives in food.

Not listed are super-sweet-tasting, zero-calorie proteins from several African fruits (monellin, brazzein and thaumatin), which have not been approved for use by the FDA. Also not included: banned or poisonous sweeteners, such as lead acetate, which ancient Romans made by cooking sour wine in lead pots.

Sweetners

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

Top of Page


2010

Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155

This book (PDF), by Albert Khazan, represents a result of many-year theoretical research, which manifested hyperbolic law in Mendeleev's Periodic Table.

According to [Khazan's] law, an upper limit (heaviest element) exists in Mendeleev's Table, whose atomic mass is 411.66 and No.155. It is shown that the heaviest element No.155 can be a reference point in nuclear reactions. Due to symmetry of the hyperbolic law, the necessity of the Table of Anti-Elements, consisting of anti-substance, has been predicted. This manifests that the found hyperbolic law is universal, and the Periodic Table is common for elements and anti-elements.

Top of Page


2014

URENCO Periodic Table

A periodic table by URENCO showing which non-radioactive (stable) elements are suitable for isotopic enrichment using gas centrifuge technology:

URENCO gas centrifuge enrichment

Top of Page


2008 Periodic Table of Videos

The chemistry department at the University of Nottingham has produced a series of YouTube video information clips about the chemical elements:

Top of Page


2004

Visual Elements Periodic Table

Visual Elements Periodic Table

Top of Page


2016

Where Your Elements Came From Periodic Table

  • The hydrogen in your body, present in every molecule of water, came from the Big Bang. There are no other appreciable sources of hydrogen in the universe.
  • The carbon in your body was made by nuclear fusion in the interior of stars, as was the oxygen.
  • Much of the iron in your body was made during supernovas of stars that occurred long ago and far away.
  • The gold in your jewelry was likely made from neutron stars during collisions that may have been visible as short-duration gamma-ray bursts.
  • Elements like phosphorus and copper are present in our bodies in only small amounts but are essential to the functioning of all known life.

The featured periodic table, from Astronomy Picture of The Day (APOD) is color coded to indicate humanity's best guess as to the nuclear origin of all known elements. The sites of nuclear creation of some elements, such as copper, are not really well known and are continuing topics of observational and computational research.

Where Your Elements Came From

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

Top of Page


1934

White's Periodic Table

The periodic table of White shows the normal state electronic configurations, from H.E. White. Introduction to Atomic Spectra. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1934,
p. 85, Table 5.4..

Helium is clearly associated with H, and placed above Be in accord with the s2 electron configuration of the free atom.

Top of Page


1998

Wooden Periodic Table Table

Theodore Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Tablea wooden table that incorporates a periodic table – is a treasure trove, both on the web and in reality (his office).

The web site contains over 12 gig of data and beautiful images. Explore!

 

 

Theo's new site is periodictable.com.

Top of Page


2010

World's Smallest Periodic Table

The World's Smallest Periodic Table:

Top of Page


1996

X-ray Absorption Edges

The periodic table links to tabulations of an elements characteristic x-ray absorption edge energies, and of the anomalous scattering coefficients f' and f" as a function of incident x-ray energy:

Top of Page


 

 

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

 

 


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


Queries, Suggestions, Bugs, Errors, Typos...

If you have any:

Queries
Comments
Suggestions or periodic table representations not shown on this page
Suggestions for links
Bug, typo or grammatical error reports about this page,

please contact Mark R. Leach, the author, using mrl@meta-synthesis.com

This free, open access web book is an ongoing project and your input is appreciated.

Online Marketing
OnToplist is optimized by SEO
Add blog to our blog directory.

counter started in 2011